How to update files using FilesMatch .htaccess max-age=

Hi,

If I'm using the following to cache my javascript and CSS files:

<FilesMatch "\.(js|css)$">
  FileETag -INode MTime Size
  Header set Cache-Control "max-age=604800, public, must-revalidate"
</FilesMatch>

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And I'm updating my files and changing the code then how do I reset the cache? Is there a better way to set the cache of javascript and CSS or image files while having the versatility of updating the code and seeing the updates immediately by simply using CTL+F5?

Thank you,
Victor
Victor KimuraSEO, Web DeveloperAsked:
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Steve BinkCommented:
As I understand it, the must-revalidate directive should handle this for you.

http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec14.html#sec14.9.4
Victor KimuraSEO, Web DeveloperAuthor Commented:
Hmmm...ok.

It states "(I.e., the cache MUST do an end-to-end revalidation every time, if, based solely on the origin server's Expires or max-age value, the cached response is stale.)"

But it's still not really clear if, say, a particular js file is less than the max-age value or Expires value then will the client still receive the latest file that I just uploaded?

There is something I read from Google about URL fingerprinting but looks more complicated. The option they suggested is:

Another strategy is to create a new release directory for each new version of the application and put all the assets for each version in the versioned directory. This has the drawback that if an asset doesn't change between versions, its URL will still change forcing a re-download. Using content hashes does not suffer from this problem but is slightly more complex.

https://developers.google.com/speed/docs/insights/LeverageBrowserCaching

I guess the file-append-date-time.js may work in this case.

But I'm wondering if anyone has any suggestions other than the one Google posted.
Steve BinkCommented:
Based on your Google reference, I think that would be option you need.  If the browser is not going to issue a GET until the expiry/age has been reached, it will never know about your newly modified file.  

If you need this for only a file or two, I would use the fingerprinting method.

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Steve BinkCommented:
No points.  You found the answer...I just agreed with it. :)
Victor KimuraSEO, Web DeveloperAuthor Commented:
Ok, thank you, @routinet! =)
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