Include non-Excel steps in an Excel macro

Hello,

Is there any way to include non-Excel steps in an Excel macro?

For example, suppose you want to be able to click (cell G7 say) in a certain worksheet, and by doing so, have it open a blank notepad. Or suppose, by clicking cell G8, you would like to be able to open a new email window in MS Outlook.

Is that doable?

Thanks
Steve_BradyAsked:
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Farzad AkbarnejadDeveloperCommented:
Hi,
See the attached workbook. It contains VBA code in Sheet1 code page
Private Sub Worksheet_SelectionChange(ByVal Target As Range)
    If Target = Range("G7") Then
        Shell "Notepad"
    ElseIf Target = Range("G8") Then
        Shell "outlook.exe /c ipm.note /m someone@somewhere.foo"
    End If
End Sub

Open in new window

-FA
Book1.xlsm
byundtMechanical EngineerCommented:
You can launch other applications from an Excel macro. One way is to create an object pointing to the other application. This may be done using early-binding (requires setting a reference to a particular version of the other application) or late-binding (runs slower, but doesn't generate an error message if the user has a different version of the application than you do). I use early-binding during program development because it exposes the object model for the other application, but then switch to late-binding before delivering the project to avoid the run-time error messages.

The other way is to use Shell to launch the application (as FarzadA has done). Use this approach if creating an object pointing to the other application doesn't work (such as for MS Paint).

Details of exactly how to do it will depend on the application you need to run, and whether it might already be running.

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byundtMechanical EngineerCommented:
Further to the discussion on late-binding for Outlook, Microsoft Excel MVP Ron deBruin offers an enormous amount of code for automating Outlook from Excel. Here is a typical page, where he shows how to send a small email message using an Excel macro and late-binding. http://www.rondebruin.nl/win/s1/outlook/bmail4.htm
Steve_BradyAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the responses. I appreciate the input and the links.
Steve_BradyAuthor Commented:
This thread has given rise to a couple of other questions having to do with Excel macros producing global output. Rather than add that on to this thread, I opted to begin a new one which I will post shortly.

Thanks again
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