test and uat database backups

For each business applicaiton with an underlying database, we seem to have a live production database, a test database (with test clone of the app), and also a user acceptance database for changes/upgrades. our admins only seem to backup the live production db. is this common? Or can there be instances whereby you also backup your test and uat databases as well?
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pma111Asked:
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slightwv (䄆 Netminder) Commented:
It depends on the shop.  It's all about downtime:  How long can you live without the database until you can rebuild it?

Typically test databases have a known baseline and are recovered/restored back to baseline all the time so there really isn't much of a need to back those up because you have the 'baseline' setup.

Development databases can be in any state at any time.  Also typically not backed up.

This can also vary depending on how you perform change management.  If you have source control and your database changes are in scripts that are part of the source control, then the need to backup development and test is reduced.

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johnsoneSenior Oracle DBACommented:
It definitely depends on the situation.  Most of the places I have been the non-production databases were just copies of production anyway.  There wasn't anything special in them.

If the QA team had a baseline that they needed, we made sure that was in an export file so we could easily put it back to their known good state.  So, special backups of their environments were not necessary as they only care about the known good state.  Plus we did not want to have to do a full restore just for their small set of test data.

If we had an issue with a non-production database, we would just restore production over it.  Takes the same amount of time as restoring a backup of the test database.  Development might lose some structure changes, but with good change management, you just re-apply everything.
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