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AIX IBM equivalent to "scheduled tasks"

does aix ibm have an equivalent to windows servers/OS "scheduled tasks", and if so how can you get a report of all current scheduled tasks for an AIX IBM server?
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pma111
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pma111
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1 Solution
 
woolmilkporcCommented:
That's the cron daemon and its configuration tool "crontab". Each user can have their own crontab file in /var/spool/cron/crontabs/username

Run

crontab -l

to get a list of all the scheduled tasks of your userid and run (as root)

crontab -l username

to get a list of that user's scheduled tasks.

See "man crontab" to learn about the format of a crontab file.

Basically it's this (quoting a non-AIX manpage):

Each line in the cron table follows the following format:

* * * * *  Command_to_execute
- – – – -
| | | | |
| | | | +—– Day of week (0–6) (Sunday=0) or Sun, Mon, Tue,…
| | | +———- Month (1–12) or Jan, Feb,…
| | +————-— Day of month (1–31)
| +——————– Hour (0–23)
+————————- Minute (0–59)

There are several ways of specifying multiple values in a field:

• The asterisk (*) operator specifies all possible values for a field. e.g. every hour or every day.
• The comma (,) operator specifies a list of values, for example: "1,3,4,7,8"
• The dash (-) operator specifies a range of values, for example: "1-6", which is equivalent to "1,2,3,4,5,6"
If you're root you can run something like this to get a full list:

for file in /var/spool/cron/crontabs/*; do awk 'BEGIN {print "\n" FILENAME} !/^#/ {print $0}' $file; done

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Note: Please don't edit a crontab file by hand. Use "crontab -e" to modify your crontab or (as root) "crontab -e username" to modify another user's crontab.

wmp
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pma111Author Commented:
wmp, do you have any healthcheck scripts to identify issues with AIX IBM installations, and what kind of parameters do your scripts/software check for?
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woolmilkporcCommented:
Isn't the latter a completely different question?

Anyway, we're running Nagios for monitoring since long so we don't have any elaborated scripts in place anymore.

We use to monitor filesystem filling level (df), system load (uptime), paging space consumption (lsps), paging activity (vmstat), physical CPU consumed by LPAR (lparstat) or non-LPAR (vmstat), network activity (entstat/netstat), MPIO path status (lspath for native MPIO, pcmpath for the sddpcm drivers), NFS mount status (mount), error log entries (errpt, ODM errnotify) etc. etc.

Besides that there is application specific monitoring (processes, filesystems, connectivity, responsiveness, logs ...)

For real-time monitoring try "topas" and "nmon".

You could search here at EE for e.g. "AIX monitoring" or similar and you'll find a lot of info (my contributions included) and also several scripts.

Did my little cron tutorial above help?
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pma111Author Commented:
yes it was! :(

The tutorial was useful.
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pma111Author Commented:
Would be great if you could point me in the way of those scripts?
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