Toggle Service State at Login/Logoff

We plan to utilize our logged-off workstations for renderings (via Autodesk's Backburner software) but want it set up so that when a user logs in, their workstation is removed from the pool of available render nodes.  The easiest way to do this seems to be by stopping the Backburner service when a user logs in, and starting the service when they log out.

I know I can do this via login/logoff script ("net stop/start BACKBURNER_SRV_200"), but is there a way to do this with a GPO policy (or other)?  I've otherwise eliminated the need for login/logoff scripts and would like to avoid them if possible.  Thanks!
Dan CarpIT DirectorAsked:
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Matt VCommented:
I think the only way you can do this is assigning a script via GPO to run at logon/logoff.  No matter how you do it, you will need the start/stop script file to do it.

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Will SzymkowskiSenior Solution ArchitectCommented:
You have to be able to run this when the user logs in so a GPO startup script and a GPO logoff script would be required. You could also probably do something like this from a scheduled task as well via GPO.

GPO Scheduled Task - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc725745.aspx

Will.
Dan CarpIT DirectorAuthor Commented:
Thanks guys - that's what I figured, but thought I'd inquire.  I like the idea of setting it via schedule, Will, but we also want to leave the possibility open of using workstations when a user is out of the office on any particular day.  Cheers!
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McKnifeCommented:
>   I like the idea of setting it via schedule, Will, but we also want to leave the possibility open of using workstations when a user is out of the office on any particular day.
Seems you are not familiar with task triggers. Tasks can be triggered by logon/logoff events, so that's exactly what you need.
Dan CarpIT DirectorAuthor Commented:
McKnife - looks like I jumped the gun on conceding that I was stuck with logon/logoff scripts.  Task Scheduler triggers seem to be working perfectly!  If I had a way to award extra points to you, absolutely would.  Thank you VERY much for the clarification (and again to Will for leading me in this direction).

For reference, I created two tasks:

Title: Enable Backburner
Run whether user is logged on or not / Run with highest privileges
Trigger: On an event (Log: System; Source: Winlogon; Event ID: 7002)
Action: Start a program (Program: cmd.exe; Arguments: /c "net start BACKBURNER_SRV_200")

Title: Disable Backburner
Run whether user is logged on or not / Run with highest privileges
Trigger: At log on (At log on of any user)
Action: Start a program (Program: cmd.exe; Arguments: /c "net stop BACKBURNER_SRV_200")
McKnifeCommented:
You're welcome and thanks for feedback.
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