Life span of Cat6

Hello experts,
we are about to run cables to replace old cabling (CAT5) that is starting to fail at some points.

As we are cabling main network component we would like to go with gigabit cables and CAT6 seems to be the solution. The question I'm asked to answer is how long this cable will keep up with technology?

I thought of running optic fiber for one end of the building to the other end (about 900 foots) then fuse channels to component but I just not sure if its overkill. I mean, we do not move that much data as 90% of the pc park for this building (about 25) will be thin client running remote desktop.

In short, will cat6 last for at least 5-10 years?
cabicoAsked:
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Dan CraciunIT ConsultantCommented:
I'm in about the same position and decided to go with CAT6A cable.
Done right it assures 10GB connections, which should be enough for the next 10 years.


I don't see my client buying 10GB switches soon...

HTH,
Dan
R. Andrew KoffronownerCommented:
most places I see, cat5 has lasted 10+ years without any noticeable predictable failures (an occasion problem, but 95%of the time it's  the punchdown ends not the cable).  occasionally someplace that has flexing going on wares a spot, or something gotten caught and pulled service loops to tight, but all-in-all it's still perfect in all my jobs, many of them already over 10 years old.  I work mostly in office type buildings and the CAT5 seems to be super dependable I'd expect it to last another 5-7 in nearly all cases.

You should clearly get as least as long from Cat6.  in short, yes if it's installed correctly, (tied down properly, proper service loops, punched into high quality blocks, mounted in proper face plates) it should absolutely last more than 10 years except in rare cases.
Zephyr ICTCloud ArchitectCommented:
If you really want to be futureproof you could look into Cat7 ... It's backwards compatible with Cat5/e/6 ...

More info: http://www.associatedtelephone.com/file_library/products/95_ATI-%20Cat%207%20&%207a%20Overview.pdf

http://www.xmultiple.com/xwebsite-forum24.htm

If you choose Cat6 it will definitely keep for 10/15 years, if not more ...

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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
I think the proper question is how long will 1g (to the desktop) be viable?

The answer is almost impossible to answer.  I still see some 10m connections. And there are still lots of 100m connections.  Given that 100m has been around for 20 years, 1g should be good for another 10 years.
Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
Duplicate post.
cabicoAuthor Commented:
Thank you  all for your answers,  We will go with CAT6  as fiber optic (and CAT7) will more then double the cost for no visible gain (for us).
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