generating vectors on the fly

Hi

Is it possible to generate vectors on the fly? I just need generic vectors that I then add to another  vector. I find it quite useless to create a vector and push into it  like
 std::vector<UINT64> temp;
temp.push_back(1);
temp.push_back(2);
temp.push_back(3);

 just so that i can  then add it to the enclosing vector.
enclosing_vector.push_back(temp);
temp.empty();
//add to temp again and push into enclosing_vector

I want to do something like this:
enclosing_vector.push_back(std::vector<UINT64> {1,2,3});

Is something more elegant possible?
LuckyLucksAsked:
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phoffricConnect With a Mentor Commented:
The parens are OK, but harder to type and not too stylish. You can change the () operator to, say, <<. I like this style better since it conveys the notion of pushing values to an object (like cout). Now you could write:
enclosing_vector.push_back( genVec() << 4 << 5 << 6 << 7 );

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jkrCommented:
You'd usually use 'vector::insert()' and an array for that, e.g.

UINT64 buf [] = {1,2,3};
size_t sz = sizeof(buf) / sizeof(UINT64);

enclosing_vector.insert(enclosing_vector.end(), buf, buf + sz);

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Is that what you had in mind?
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LuckyLucksAuthor Commented:
no, actually that is not what i wanted. I wanted a more elegant approach to do on the fly insertions into vectors (inserting vectors into vectors), without creating vector definitions for such a temporary use.

what you offered was another way of what i was doing in the first place and both are many lines of codes for a very simple purpose. I need something cleaner and more elegant if possible.
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jkrCommented:
Well, acting another vector to a vector still follows the same scheme, i.e.

std::vector<UINT64> temp;
temp.push_back(1);
temp.push_back(2);
temp.push_back(3);
enclosing_vector.(enclosing_vector.end(), temp.begin(), temp.end());

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Sorry, but there does not seem to be a more elegant way (or I am completely missing the point).
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jkrCommented:
Sorry, but I can only guess that with your responsiveness, this is going to en dup nowhere since you are already posing new Qs about this: http://www.experts-exchange.com/Programming/Languages/CPP/Q_28346593.html

Can we cool down (or in your case heat up) to close that step by step?

And, as a HINT: Iteraction solves problems, not getting back half a weeek later. That is just plain frustrating.
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phoffricCommented:
>> I want to do something like this: ... std::vector<UINT64> {1,2,3}
You can overload the () operator (or another operator of your choosing) to do the push backs. Here is one approach.
class genVec : public vector<uint64_t>
{
public:
   genVec & operator () (uint64_t const & val)
   {
      this->push_back(val);
      return *this;
   }
};

int main() {
   genVec gv;
   gv(1)(2)(3);

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phoffricCommented:
I just noticed that you did not want to define explicit temporary vectors. gv is a temporary, but you don't have to use it:
   vector<genVec> enclosing_vector;
   genVec gv;
   gv(1)(2)(3);
   enclosing_vector.push_back(gv);
   enclosing_vector.push_back( genVec() );
   enclosing_vector.push_back( genVec() (4)(5)(6)(7) );

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enclosing_vector now has a size of 3, and it's first element is a vector of size 3; 2nd element is a vector of size 0; 3rd vector is a vector of size 4.
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