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How to expand a chart to include 5 fields, not just 4

Posted on 2014-01-09
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Last Modified: 2014-01-16
From a query containing a Household ID and 5 quarterly values (Beginning of Year, End of 1st Quarter, End of 2nd Quarter, 3rd Quarter, End of Year), I would like to display these 5 values in a bar chart.  In the Chart Wizard, I am limited to "You can select just 6 fields to use in your chart".  So in placing the fields on the chart, I have the HHID in the Axis window, and the five value fields in the Data window, nothing in the Series window.  I link the Report and Chart with the HHID field.  I then name the chart, and choose no legend and click Finish.

Access displays 5 bars on the chart, but only 4 columns in the associated datasheet.  When I select Chart Object Edit, it only shows a datasheet containing 4 values, and a chart with 4 bars to edit.  In the print preview, there are actually 5 bars, but only 4 can be edited, and the 5th is left in its rough form.  Is this an absolute limitation in Access 2007, or is there a way to extend its capability to 5 bars?

I suppose the 6 field limit includes one for the Legend, which I don't use.  This leaves one for the Axis, and 4 Data Values.
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Question by:David_W_R
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edslee earned 500 total points
ID: 39770186
Good Evening!

I am not an expert, but I deal with this problem alot. The limitation is with the wizard, not with Access. You can indeed have more than 4 fields in a chart.

This is how I do it:
1) Use the chart Wizard to create your chart as close to how you want it as you can, in this case, select 4 of the 5 fields.
2) In design view of the report, go to the properties of the chart (rt click the chart and select properties), go to the data tab, click on the "row source" line, and then click "..." for query builder.
3) You will now see the query behind the chart. I think of this as what generates the spreadsheet that feeds the chart. You should see your 4 fields. Pull down that 5th field that you are wanting.
4) close the query builder and accept the changes.
5) Run the report with the chart to see if it worked.

I am thinking of Access 2010 as I type but the same solution was possible in 2007,...just minor differences in mouse click locations.

I hope that helps.

Repeat Disclaimer: I'm not an expert nor did I go to school for this. I just happened to learn some tough lessons over the past few years.

Ed.
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Author Comment

by:David_W_R
ID: 39783342
Thanks, Ed for the input.
However, everything I try, including editing the Row Source property, results in 5 columns, but ONLY 4 can be edited!   Any further suggestions?
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by:edslee
ID: 39783440
When you say "Only 4 can be edited", are you talking about the chart or the query columns? Do you want to post a demo file?
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Author Closing Comment

by:David_W_R
ID: 39785183
This is apparently the only solution, however Access 2007 is so clunky in the chart department, that I don't expect to be able to perform anything near what Excel can do.

Thanks again for the suggestion!
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Expert Comment

by:edslee
ID: 39785244
I actually find the charting function in MS Access to be quite powerful. If you woudl like to post a demo, I can see if I can make the adjustment for you.
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