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VMWare Template

Posted on 2014-01-09
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I have a Windows 2008 R2 template that I use in VMWare.  Most of our software people like to have their programs installed on the D: drive.  Is there a way to change the drive letter of the CDROM from D: to E: either in the template or during the customization?
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Question by:BillyRoy
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LVL 119
ID: 39770602
It cannot be done in the customization, you will need to change the "Golden Master Template".

So

1. Convert the template to a virtual machine. (Right Click Template - Convert to Virtual Machine).

2. In the Windows Server 2008 R2 ,Right Click "My Computer"

3. Select Manage

4. Select Storage > Disk Management

5. Select CD-ROM 0

6. Right Click CD-ROM 0

7. Select Change Drive Letter and Paths, and change from D to E

changecdromdrive
8. Shutdown VM

9. Right Click VM

10. Convert VM to Template
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Author Comment

by:BillyRoy
ID: 39770940
I have done that and the CD drive still reverts to D: drive when I clone from the template.  I converted the template back just to verify that the drive was set to E: and it still was.
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LVL 119
ID: 39770993
It's possible Sysprep when run "is resting devices and drivers" to defaults.

which would make it D:

You could try, not assigning a drive, and writing documentation,  for users, if they do not know, how to change, and they can set, at first logging into machines.

This is odd, though because we set our CDROM drives to Z: or Y: and they stick through the deployment process.
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Author Comment

by:BillyRoy
ID: 39771434
I just changed the templates drive to Z: to see if that made a difference.  It does not.

Is it possible to change Sysprep to not reset the devices?

This is more for a convenience to me when I build servers.
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LVL 119
ID: 39771467
No, Sysprep - resets devices and drivers.

If you do not assign a driver letter, does it add a drive letter?

do you have two disks e.g. C: and D: ?
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Author Comment

by:BillyRoy
ID: 39771517
I only have 1 disk on the template.

I removed the drive letter from the CDROM and deployed another server from the template and the CDROM comes back as the D: Drive.
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LVL 119
ID: 39771570
So if the first disk is C:

and the CDROM is D:

how would someone install applications on D:?

there is no disk for D:?

Do they add a new disk, themselves as admins?
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Accepted Solution

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BillyRoy earned 0 total points
ID: 39771712
I added a 5GB second drive to the template for now.  I will expand it as needed.  This will work out ok for the servers that need the second drive, I will just delete it when it is not needed.  This seems to be the only solution for me, to get the CDROM to E:.

Most of the time I get the servers completely ready with all of the storage configured per their specs.  I have to change the CDROM from D: to E: and add the second drive.
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