Solved

Configure server to boot from kernal on sdcard

Posted on 2014-01-09
4
314 Views
Last Modified: 2016-11-23
Hello All,

I would like to take one of my dell servers and setup centos or debian on it, have it boot the kernal and boot code from a sdcard and just have the filesystem on the drives. this way i can load what i need on it, and then tar up the filesystem and use that to duplicate it on other machines. by just untarring the FS to another drive on same type of server and just have that boot from sd card also.

i cant see how to do this with normal centos or debian, all i see is support for ARM processors.

can someone point me in the proper direction?

thanks
Dave
0
Comment
Question by:WCGS_Operations
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 2
4 Comments
 
LVL 88

Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 333 total points
ID: 39770728
Installing most current Linux OS's to an SD card or USB stick is no different from installing it to a standard HD or RAID array. During the installation procedure just make sure you select the correct disk (in this case the SD card), and when you get to the point where you can choose where you want grub to be installed, again make sure you select the correct destination. To make things easier you could remove all other HD's from the server during the installation.

Also make sure your server can, and is setup to boot first from the SD card.
0
 

Author Comment

by:WCGS_Operations
ID: 39770859
Rindi,

thanks for your response, however i might have not explained my question properly. i only want the boot code and kernal on the sd card, and but the entire file system on the hard drive. i dont want the entire install on the sd card.

thanks
Dave
0
 
LVL 88

Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 333 total points
ID: 39770986
During the installation you can make your /boot partition be on the SD card (along with the Grub boot-loader). The kernel is located in /boot for most distro's. / and any others can be on the standard disks. You can do this selection at the partitioning option during the installation procedure.
0
 
LVL 34

Accepted Solution

by:
Duncan Roe earned 167 total points
ID: 39772576
Unless you have a monolithic kernel, you will have a sizable part of the Linux OS in /lib/modules/$(uname -r). You could move this entire directory tree onto the SD card and create a symbolic link in /lib/modules. I think that should work - but keep a backup kernel in your Grub menu just in case
0

Featured Post

Ransomware: The New Cyber Threat & How to Stop It

This infographic explains ransomware, type of malware that blocks access to your files or your systems and holds them hostage until a ransom is paid. It also examines the different types of ransomware and explains what you can do to thwart this sinister online threat.  

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Linux users are sometimes dumbfounded by the severe lack of documentation on a topic. Sometimes, the documentation is copious, but other times, you end up with some obscure "it varies depending on your distribution" over and over when searching for …
If, like me, you have a lot of Dell servers in the estate you manage this article should save you a little time. When attempting to login to iDrac on any server I would be presented with two errors. The first reads "Do you want to run this applicati…
Learn several ways to interact with files and get file information from the bash shell. ls lists the contents of a directory: Using the -a flag displays hidden files: Using the -l flag formats the output in a long list: The file command gives us mor…
This demo shows you how to set up the containerized NetScaler CPX with NetScaler Management and Analytics System in a non-routable Mesos/Marathon environment for use with Micro-Services applications.

740 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question