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Local network configuration using a cable ISP

Posted on 2014-01-09
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Last Modified: 2014-01-15
Greetings,

I have a small network that I support that is now using a cable provider for internet service and connectivity to the server. This network has been using static IP addresses (192.168.xx.xx) for connectivity but I'm guessing that this will have to change when we going through ComCast (ISP). When I connected a workstation to the MODEM it pulled an IP of 10.xx.xx.xx. While working with one of they're first level support folks I described what needed to be done and the tech said for me to use a static IP on the server of 50.243.xx.xx. How this could work I didn't  understand and proceeded to push the cut-over out until I can feel more confident with the configuration. What I'm interested in hearing back on is your thoughts on network configuration in this type of environment where we have three MODEMS in three different physical locations using an ISP to not only connect to the internet but also connect to a windows server 2008 R2.

Thanks experts.
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Question by:bjbrown
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4 Comments
 
LVL 13

Assisted Solution

by:ktaczala
ktaczala earned 668 total points
ID: 39770074
You should never have a public IP address on your private LAN.
it should be set up as follows:
Internet >> Cable/comcast device >> Router/Firewall >> switch >> internal devices
Public IP  on external port of router/firewall i.e. ISP provided may be either static or dynamic
Private IP on internal port of router/firewall i.e 192.168.0.1
Local LAN private subnet i.e. 192.168.x.2 - 192.168.0.254
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LVL 84

Assisted Solution

by:Dave Baldwin
Dave Baldwin earned 668 total points
ID: 39770146
On my old Comcast modem that did not have a router, it did supply the public IP address if I had only one computer connected without a router.  As soon as I connected a router to it, the public IP address changed though.  

My current Comcast modem/router combo returns 10.0.0.1 as the gateway IP address.  The "XFINITY Network" status page shows both an IPV4 and an IPV6 address now.  The "Local IP Network" page shows that I can change the IPV4 Gateway Address (10.0.0.1) if I wanted to.  It doesn't offer that option for the local IPV6 gateway and DHCP.
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Accepted Solution

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aindelicato earned 664 total points
ID: 39770250
@Dave .. ISPs will generally change the IP address when the MAC address that connects to their modem changes, in the case when you switched from a computer to a router.

Listen to ktaczala.  It is explained perfectly.

Do NOT change your current LAN to match the Comcast IP addressing.

Leave the Comcast router serving 10.x.x.x IPs .. get yourself a firewall or router and configure to use your current IP subnet.  Make the router address .1 or .254 just to make it easy to remember as long as those aren't in use already.  That IP will be the gateway address for your network, you may have to change your DHCP scope settings to assign that gateway to your workstations.

Connect that firewall/router to the same switch that all your workstations and server are connected to.

You'll essentially be running 2 networks..

Private LAN - 192.168.x.x
DMZ - 10.x.x.x
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Author Closing Comment

by:bjbrown
ID: 39783397
Thank you
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