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AppDomain 2 (mssqlsystemresource.dbo[ddl].1) unloaded in SQL Server Log

Posted on 2014-01-10
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Last Modified: 2014-01-12
Periodically we see the following messages in one of our SQL Servers:

AppDomain 7 (mssqlsystemresource.dbo[ddl].6) unloaded.

Unsafe assembly 'microsoft.sqlserver.mpusqlclrwrapper, version=10.0.0.0, culture=neutral, publickeytoken=89845dcd8080cc91, processorarchitecture=msil' loaded into appdomain 4 (mssqlsystemresource.dbo[runtime].3).

AppDomain 4 (mssqlsystemresource.dbo[runtime].3) created.
AppDomain 3 (mssqlsystemresource.dbo[ddl].2) unloaded.
AppDomain 2 (mssqlsystemresource.dbo[ddl].1) unloaded.

Common language runtime (CLR) functionality initialized using CLR version v2.0.50727 from C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v2.0.50727\


Is this anything to be concernened about?

Thank you
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Question by:aiopsit
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Ryan McCauley earned 500 total points
ID: 39773831
I wouldn't be concerned as long as you're not seeing any connection drops or other negative behavior associated with the message.

SQL Server (starting with 2005) allows .NET code to be called from T-SQL (with proper configuration and precautions). The term "UNSAFE" (in the .NET assembly sense) isn't a term to be concerned about - it just denotes an assembly that may access components of the system that are protected. Specifically (from TechNet):

UNSAFE  code permission is for those situations in which an assembly is not verifiably safe or requires additional access to restricted resources, such as the Microsoft Win32 API.

Though I've never seen this message specifically, it just means that SQL Server has unloaded the assembly to free up memory or because it's not currently being used.
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