reg.OpenSubKey returns incorrect subkey counts and values compared to registry values

I'm trying to programmatically return the ODBC driver list from the registry.  The values and names returned are very different (in total number, values, and language) than the list of values seen using regedit.  How do I get the values returned I am expecting?  NOTE: This is in Windows 8.1 64 bit.

This is the code used:
-----------------------
internal static List<String> GetSystemDriverList()
        {
            var names = new List<string>();
            Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey reg = (Microsoft.Win32.Registry.LocalMachine).OpenSubKey("Software");

            if (reg != null)
            {
                reg = reg.OpenSubKey("ODBC");
                if (reg != null)
                {
                    reg = reg.OpenSubKey("ODBCINST.INI");
                    if (reg != null)
                    {

                        reg = reg.OpenSubKey("ODBC Drivers");
                        if (reg != null)
                        {
                            // Get all DSN entries defined in DSN_LOC_IN_REGISTRY.
                            foreach (string sName in reg.GetValueNames())
                            {
                                names.Add(sName);
                            }
                        }
                        try
                        {
                            reg.Close();
                        }
                        catch { }
                    }
                }
            }

            return names;
        }


---------
These are the actual registry values:
Registry
But, this is what is returned (first 14 entries shown in the image -- very different than the actual registry values):
returned ODBC driver values (erroneous)
temeriousAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
Craig WagnerConnect With a Mentor Software ArchitectCommented:
On the Build page of your project's properties it is probably set to either Any CPU or x86. Change it to x64 and you should get the results you expect.
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Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)Connect With a Mentor PresidentCommented:
My understanding is that the registry on 64 bits computers is in 2 parts, and the section that is used maps to the Platform target as hinted by Craig.

If you compile to x64, you end up in the standard HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ node of the registry, which is the default for a 64-bit application. Theses are the 64-bit drivers are located, and this is what you see in your screen shot.

If you compile to x86, then you end up in the other section of the registry that has been set (as I understand) to enable 32-bit application to keep working properly on 64-bit computers. The results you get then comes from HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\ODBC, where the 32-bit ODBC drivers are located. This is what you get in your code.

 (Wonder what the Wow is for. Might be that the programmer who decided on that name is an avid player of World of Warcraft :-)

If you compile with AnyCPU, then where you end up depends on whether the system will end up working in 32-bits ou 64-bits when the application is launched, with some interference from the Prefer 32-bit build option. As I understand it, it depends on the dlls used by the application. This is usually the best way to compile.

The reason why it works so is that 64-bit applications can have problems using 32-bit dlls, since they use values that might be too big for 32-bit.
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Craig WagnerSoftware ArchitectCommented:
FWIW, WoW64 stands for Windows on Windows 64-bit (or Windows on 64-bit Windows).
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Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)PresidentCommented:
Thanks Craig. But want an awful expression.

I was thinking that now that the compiler is a lot slower (compared to previous versions of Visual Studio), maybe someone as Microsoft was playing WoW while he waited for Windows 8 64-bit to compile :-)
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