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aix ibm backup utilities

Posted on 2014-01-13
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Are there any default backup utilities for aix ibm systems, i.e. those built into the OS? And are there any useful tools/techniques to identify ie missing backups, areas of disk not backed up, no recent backup, failed backups etc etc, as you can do with most database software...

If you had to determine what was being backed up on an AIX system, using default tools, how would you do this?
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Question by:pma111
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woolmilkporc earned 167 total points
ID: 39776601
AIX doesn't have a really comprehensive backup tool.

There is "backup", of course. This tool can backup files by name or by filesystem.

See "man backup" for the various flags and options. To make online FS backups you can use the "split copy" ("snapshot") feature of AIX 5 and up. Output can go to tape/cartridge or to stdout so you can pipe it to e.g. "dd" or "tar" etc.
See "smitty backfilesys" and "smitty backsnap".

"backup" maintains a file "/etc/dumpdates" to enable incremental backups (Note: you must use the "-u" flag of "backup" to make this work). The "/etc/dumpdates" file contains  the raw device name of the file system and the time, date, and level of the backup, so this could serve as a backup history. This is the only source of information, so the needs you mentioned in the Q can only be met in a very rudimentary way.

I'd suggest looking for commercial backup solutions, such as TSM, or CA Arcserve or EMC Networker etc. There are also free tols like Bacula (client only) etc.

By the way, the counterpart of "backup" is "restore", as one would expect.

I think you're aware that AIX has all those tools like tar, dd, cpio, but I'm not inclined to call these a "backup solution", because quite a lot of homemade scripting is always required to make them work in a reliable and comprehensive way.
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by:gheist
gheist earned 167 total points
ID: 39777348
Only  systembackup for aix is mksysb that makes bootable bakckup.
Then you need to back up other volume groups
If you use raw volumes then you need to back them up from database using them.

If you want them all in one there is Tivoli Storage Manager (100$/year/client)
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by:woolmilkporc
ID: 39777411
Well, alright,

I didn't mention mksysb because I assumed that pma111 was asking for user data backup.

But it's correct, of course, that mksysb is a tool everyone should know (and use!) when it comes to AIX system backups.

"man mksysb" for more.

Use  "smitty mksysb" (backup the system to tape/file/UDFS) or "smitty mkdvd" (backup to DVD).
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by:madunix
madunix earned 166 total points
ID: 39794014
Please check the following link, showing backup AIX OS, data and restore AIX OS, data using AIX commands.
https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/mehdi/resource/IBMexam104studyguide.pdf?lang=en   [written by Mehdi Salehi]
Please note, mksysb only backs up files and directories in rootvg that are mounted.
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by:gheist
ID: 39794202
yes, you need to back up other volume groups and raw (under DBs or not mounted) volumes separately. That lands you with 3 tapes minimum.
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