std::string pointer

std::string *str1;
int main (int argc, char* argv[]) {

        process();
        printf("String = %s\n", str1->c_str());  // THIS SUCCEEDED 

}

void process() {
        std::string str;
        std::set<uint64_t> vals;
        vals.insert(12);
        vals.insert(14);
        for(std::set<uint64_t>::iterator it = vals.begin(); it != vals.end(); ++it) {
                str += boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(*it);
                str += ":";
        }

        str1 = &(str);
}

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Why does the printf in the main() does not seg faults and prints correct value 12:14:

Shouldn't it seg fault as it is trying to access memory which is out of scope. I mean the variable str inside process() function goes out of scope once the control returns from the function
perlperlAsked:
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ZoppoConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Hi perlperl,

IMO it depends on how the string class is implemented and what code the compiler creates. Of course it's errornous but this doesn't mean it has to crash in every case. If i.e. the string destructor doesn't reset some values (i.e. the pointer to the allocated memory) and if deallocating the memory in string destructor doesn't overwrite the content and there's coincidentally a terminating 0 char the printf can work without problems anyway.

BTW: I tested the same in Windows with Visual Studio, there it either crashs or outputs some trash.

ZOPPO
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perlperlAuthor Commented:
I see.  I tried several times on my linux machine and it fails sometimes, so it all depends on if the memory was cleared during runtime or not.

Thanks
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evilrixSenior Software Engineer (Avast)Commented:
This is an example of what the C++ standard would defined as "undefined behaviour". This means that anything can happen. It might work, it might not - it all depends on the platform and the compiler and which way the wind is blowing at the time. Sufficed to say, this type of code is always considered defective.

The standard also defines "unspecified behaviour", which is also platform and compiler dependent; however, this will always behave exactly the same for a given compiler and platform. This type of code is not considered defective; however, it is considered bad practice to rely on such code.

You can read more on my blog: http://evilrix.com/2013/05/09/doubt-and-uncertainty/
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