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Linux ownerships

Posted on 2014-01-15
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Last Modified: 2014-01-15
I have mistakenly changed the ownership and group on an entire RHEL6 system rather than the subdirectory I wanted. I have since changed everything back to root:root.

Is this ok or am I still screwed?
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Question by:cotton0226
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by:Zephyr ICT
ID: 39782664
Is this ok or am I still screwed?

I hope you have a backup or can re-install the machine because well... You said it.

You might get somewhere by following this guide though, worth a shot:

http://www.adminlinux.org/2009/07/how-to-restore-default-system.html
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by:farzanj
ID: 39782685
You better have a backup because you now have all kinds of issues including security apart from other issues.
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arnold earned 500 total points
ID: 39782736
you could use rpm to reverify the installed packages in hopes that it resets the ownership.

If you have an identical system, you could use getfacl to get the correct settings from a reference system and then use setfacl to correct the settings on this system.

Depending on what this system does, certain things may have broken i.e. no longer functioning because of the permissions issues.

Backup as others pointed out is the quickestw but make sure to copy anything you've added after as well as if this system is receiving external data (mail server) get that data off or you will loose it.
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Author Closing Comment

by:cotton0226
ID: 39782768
Thanks all. We are reloading from backup.
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