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Questions about Circuit ID's T1, etc

I have Circuit ID's that I need to identify:
They were installed by Verizon.
Do T1 circuits begin with prefix "P"?
Do HIPC begin with "B"? (See attached graphic),
Can someone tell me what the other two circuit ID's are for?
- 20M eNet Port
- 20M eNet Access
I know 20M stands for 20 Mbps.
Finally, I see an entry named "PVCID".  How does this differ from circuit ID?
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brothertruffle880
Asked:
brothertruffle880
3 Solutions
 
Jan SpringerCommented:
I am not seeing an attached graph.

But I can tell you that a PVC ID is associated with an ATM (usually) or frame-relay link.
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MysidiaCommented:
The PVC numbers are a configuration detail --  permanent virtual channel id numbers, for an ATM link; expressed in the form of a VPI number for virtual path id and VCI number for virtual channel id.

What do the circuit ID numbers look like in more detail?

Starting with P or B does not indicate T1 or type of circuit,  to my knowledge.
There are some common formats.

But various providers also often have their own convention, as to the format of circuit IDs they will provide/present to end customer.

It may be different, even within different  regions, with the same telco provider!
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brothertruffle880Author Commented:
Oops!  Here they are.  

circuit numbers
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brothertruffle880Author Commented:
We use Verizon and I can't find any guide on their business site assisting with the deciphering of circuit ID naming conventions.
Why does my 20M circuit also have an access ID?  isn't a circuit ID enough?  Or the PVCID enough?
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JRSCGICommented:
Typically, HIPC stands for Hosted IP Centrex - are you using this service from Verizon?  If so, the WAN link would typically be an Ethernet uplink port.

When you have both a port charge and an access charge, only the access component has a "circuit ID".  

Are you trying to identify the physical circuit or the billing entry that matches the service?
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JRSCGICommented:
To further explain, a Telco Ethernet WAN link will typically have two charges / billing codes.  The access charge is the maximum capacity of the local loop.  The port charge is the bandwidth contract amount.  These two will often match, but in some cases an access line is larger to accommodate multiple services, room for growth, bursting (if ordering a service that allows it) or when the media type dictates a larger access line than the bandwidth needed for the application.  

Thus, the two 20M entries you show in the graphic above are related to a single circuit, not two separate circuits.
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brothertruffle880Author Commented:
JRSCGI:
I'm trying to understand the difference between 20M enet Port and 20M eNet Access?  They're both related to a single circuit.  Why have two different reference numbers?

Yes.  we're using HIPC by Verizon along with MPLS by Verizon.  I also have a feeling that we may be getting billed for circuits we're not using!  But that's another matter for another posting.
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JRSCGICommented:
Because the Telco charges you one rate for the access circuit (the local loop between your site and their central office) and another rate for the amount of bandwidth contracted - the port size on their switch.  MPLS always has these two charges, and remember your port size and your access line are not always the same size.
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