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VMWare 5.0 Resources

How can I determine if 32 gb of memory for a physical server is enough for the vm's?   How can i calculate?

Thanks
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Jack_son_
Asked:
Jack_son_
3 Solutions
 
fredvr666Commented:
I thought 2 gb for the vmware os rest you can use for the vm's.
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Seth SimmonsSr. Systems AdministratorCommented:
calculate the needs of your guests first
from there add a bit extra for breathing room
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Jack_son_Author Commented:
okay, is there a calculation to determine how many vm's I can run on this amount of memory or a standard?
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Jack_son_Author Commented:
thanks, what is the rule of thumb to do the calculation?
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
it really depends on what OS and which version of OS, you are going to run.

e.g. Windows 2008 R2 (64 bit), I would start out with 4GB per Server.

and fine tune later, by analysising active memory, and increase or take away from VMs.

HOW TO:  Performance Monitor vSphere 4.x or 5.0

If I was deploying a server with 32GB of RAM, I'd be working towards 8 average Windows 2012 VMs.

But how many cores, and how many processors in the VM?

e.g. vCenter Server is recommended to use 12GB.

VMware vSphere Data Protection Appliance 10GB-16GB.

We deployed a Windows 2012 R2 Server today, it will be used for SQL, it's currenty allocated 6GB, but I'm sure it will be increased.

Also a License Server for a Network Dongle, Windows 2012 R2, that was allocated 4GB. (probably over kill on that, time will tell)

A new TFS server was deployed with 4GB, and this was also using  Windows 2012 R2, I think this will also require alot more memory in the future.

The benefit of virtualisation, is we can be granular with memory settings, take away and add, and if you Enable Hot Plug Memory and Hot Plug CPU, before starting the VM, you can change Hot (provided the OS supports it!)

It's worth having a look at VMware Operations Manager, because it can "predict" if you need to increase or decrease requirements, in what it calls "efficiency".

Our new VMware vSphere farm is currently ready 88% effecient. Predicting we can recover memoy and vCPU from current VMs which have been comnfigured by Admins!

and there are only 30 VMs at present!
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