Is it possible to identify locked vmdk file utilizing powershell

Hi Everyone,

I was wondering if anyone knew if it were at all possible to utilize Powershell to identify whether or not a VMDK file had a lock on it.  I am familiar with the method of connecting to the host and running vmkfstools -d against the vmdk however powershell would be a lot faster.  I recently identified numerous potential floating non-attached vmdk (zombie) files but before I delete them I want to ensure they are not tethered to anything.  

I am pasting in a screenshot of the method I am aware of with the information I would be looking for if you connect to the host directly.

Locked File ExampleThe circled items are what I am most interested in obtaining.  Mode indicates if the file is locked and the second item is the host that has the file lock.

-      mode 0 = no lock
-      mode 1 = is an exclusive lock (vmx file of a powered on VM, the currently used disk (flat or delta), *vswp, etc.)
-      mode 2 = is a read-only lock (e.g. on the ..-flat.vmdk of a running VM with snapshots)
-      mode 3 = is a multi-writer lock (e.g. used for MSCS clusters disks or FT VMs).
RyanMyers83Asked:
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QlemoConnect With a Mentor DeveloperCommented:
You need to be more precise. The script I linked to shows all VMDKs which are not part of VM definitions in vCenter. That's very safe, as those cannot be in use by anyone.

What it doesn't is looking for offline VMs. Any VM displaying in the vCenter inventory is considered to be "valid". If you want to consider offline VMs' disk files as orphaned, we can do that by using
$arrUsedDisks = Get-View -ViewType VirtualMachine |
  ? { $_.Runtime.PowerState -eq 'poweredoff' } | 
  % {$_.Layout} | % {$_.Disk} | % {$_.DiskFile}

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QlemoDeveloperCommented:
Is the script at http://techdump.co.uk/2011/10/check-for-orphaned-vmdk-files-in-vcenter-using-powercli/ to find orphaned VMDKs via PowerCLI what you search for?
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RyanMyers83Author Commented:
Hi Qlemo,

Not quite what I'm looking for although thats a cool script.  I actually use RVtools (free app) to identify what should be orphaned files.  My Goal is to verify that the files are in fact not in use by anything by utilizing powershell to accomplish the task I pasted above.  Perhaps it may be a bit redundant to do so but I'm working in a production environment and I would rather be on the safer side.
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RyanMyers83Author Commented:
Thanks Qlemo
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