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VB6 32-bit app on W7 64

Posted on 2014-01-17
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Last Modified: 2014-01-20
Hi All,
Does anyone know whether any changes are required to the setup.lst before installing it via the standard (bundled with VB6) setup.exe? (I don't have VB6 for 64-bit so will need to edit the lst file manually.)
It appears most of the old OCXs etc are installed with W7 in syswow64 - are there multiple (32 and 64 bit) entries in the registry, or how does the app which to use?
thanks for any comment.
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Question by:COACHMAN99
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Applications written in VB6 are supported even on W8 64-bit, but some don't work because they uses libraries (dlls) that are not compatible with 64-bit.

However, there is not VB6 64-bit, and the VB6 development environment is not supported on 64-bit, so you can have problems making changes to the code and/or recompiling it and/or recreating a new setup on a 64-bit computer.

It is thus suggested to make any changes and compiles to VB6 application on a computer that still runs on 32-bit. The applications compiled that way will work as they did unless they use non compatible dlls.
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by:COACHMAN99
ID: 39791155
Thanks for the response.
My question relates to the setup.lst, and whether i need to edit it to accommodate syswow64?
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by:COACHMAN99
ID: 39791166
Thanks for the response.
My question relates to the setup.lst, and whether i need to edit it to accommodate syswow64?
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Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger) earned 500 total points
ID: 39791209
No, the applications install the same way as they did before. WOW is simply Windows on Windows. It's an emulator that makes older application run on a 64-bit computer as they did on a 32-bit environment.

You thus not have to do anything. Install with the same setup package that you used before.

If it does not work, then there is nothing to do except communicate with the vendors of the libraries you use to know if they redesigned their 32-bit library to work in a 64-bit environment.

One other problem you might encounter is some older libraries that were automatically installed on Windows XP and are not anymore on newer versions of Windows. DAO is one I was confronted with. You might need to install these manually on the computers if you find out that this happens.
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by:COACHMAN99
ID: 39792561
Thanks for the reassurance. I was wondering how the old vb6 install package knew to put the libraries in syswow but it sounds positive.
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by:Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)
Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger) earned 500 total points
ID: 39792693
What you call the "VB6 install package" has not much to do with VB6. The setup and deployment wizard simply creates a standard .msi file. What you get finally is a standard "Windows install package".

Since most applications, not matter how they were developped, installed through .msi files in the past, the new versions of Windows know what to do with that.

It's the Windows Installer that detects that your application is 32-bit and store it so that it goes in the "special" Program Files (x86) directory, and handles it through WOW when you launch it. If your VB6 package did not work in 64-bit, none of the other 32-bit applications would work.

Microsoft already lived the pains of the passage from 16-bit to 32-bit in the 90's. They knew better how to prepare for 32 to 64 passage this time.

Programs and dlls that followed the rules still work. Those who tried to break the rules, by using undocumented features for instance, are the ones that crash.
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