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Question re Exchange .log files

I notice that on my Exchange 2010 server there are thousands of .LOG files of the form E00000500C.log - I mean 180,000 of them.

As I understand it these log files contain details of email traffic and they need to be consolidated with the actual Exchange database - is that correct?

From what I've read thus far it seems that backing up Exchange will do this. At present I only to a VMware VDR local image of said server and a Veeam offsite replication of it.

Should I set up a simple old fashioned full backup of that server to sort these log files out or is there some witchcraft involved here?  The aim is to maybe have less data being replicated off-site as the WAN link is slow.

Advice appreciated.

Thanks
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funasset
Asked:
funasset
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2 Solutions
 
Thomas DarkCommented:
Hi funasset,

Microsoft Exchange Transaction Logs are cleared when a backup is completed. If the data has been manually backed up, and the logs are retained, you should have no problems manually deleting them (as I said, only after a successful backup). For example, when a Symantec Backup Exec backup job runs, it sets the flag for transaction logs to be cleared. It should happen automatically at that point.

Regards,
Tom
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Simon Butler (Sembee)ConsultantCommented:
Neither of what you are doing is considered a "real" backup of the Exchange database, so doesn't cause Exchange to flush the logs.

Therefore you have two options.

1. Do an Exchange aware backup at regular intervals.
Even with what you are doing at the moment there is still a place for traditional backups. This is usually archival reasons, where you want to go back six months or more to look for some content.
Lots of choice there, the most basic is the Windows Backup solution (built in), but that isn't very flexible. you could also look at Backup Assist, which is cheap and does the job (I use it myself and on about a dozen clients), right up to Backup Exec.

2. Enable circular logging.
This will stop the logs from building up at all, so once they are committed to the database they are flushed. However this does limit your recovery options. Unless you are doing a real time replication of the data, you will lose data in the event of a recovery from database or hardware failure. It very much depends on how confident you are about dealing with failure. Remember that for most businesses the most valuable content is less than 24 hours old.

Simon.
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funassetAuthor Commented:
Thanks all.  The Veeam software I use is (allegedly) backup and replication so if I looked in to doing say a bi-weekly 'normal' backup of that to some local storage then this would keep the log files to a sensible level? Failing that just a WindowsBackup from the Exchange server to a local disk or similar perhaps - you only have to look at Veeam in a strange way and it seems to fall over.

In the event of failure I would use either the local VMware VDR backup image or the remote Veeam VM copy image if I had to i.e. although it would be nice to have an alternative backup I'm not going to rely on whatever new backup data I create.

Sound like a plan?
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funassetAuthor Commented:
Veeam Backup did the trick thanks.
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