convert ssl cert to .pem

How do I convert a certificate from .crt  that I recieved from a certificate authority?  Or is it better to have the vendor do this?
Jack_son_Asked:
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Dave HoweSoftware and Hardware EngineerCommented:
Yup. But almost always, anything that *requires* a PEM file is either on linux or ported from linux - and linux/unix rarely uses file extensions, that's mostly a DOS/Windows thing... although oddly, apache itself often does to recognise which scripting engine to call for which serverside script :)
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Dave HoweSoftware and Hardware EngineerCommented:
it may already be in PEM format - open it in a text editor, if it starts with
-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
then its a PEM :)

if not, its easy to get it to be one in windows. just double-click it, and on the resulting certificate popup, select "details" and "copy to file" - you want "Base-64 encoded x.509" which is PEM format :)
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Jack_son_Author Commented:
great, it does say ----BEGIN CERTIFICATE----

so this is pem?        can i just rename the file extension?
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Dave HoweSoftware and Hardware EngineerCommented:
yep, that is PEM. You can rename it if that makes you feel better :)


I take it you want it for apache or something? in which case, you don't even need to rename it, apache won't care :)
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Jack_son_Author Commented:
ok - thanks
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cristiantmCommented:
Since it is already answered, just a complement:

Extensions are just something to give for a software a *hint* about what is inside. Windows accepts .crt and .cer as extensions for Certificates, no matter how they are encoded in the file. Mosf software will accept a file even if the extension is not "correct", if what it expects is correclty encoded inside.

Certificates may be PEM or DER encoded. DER is ASN.1 binary encoding. PEM is base 64 encoding with headers and footers (the ----BEGIN CERTIFICATE), therefore with printable chars that can be better exchanged in some protocols (or by mail, for example).
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