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Group Policy Server 2008 R2

Posted on 2014-01-29
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Last Modified: 2014-01-29
When deploying a printer via group policy, does the policy check to see that the printer is still deployed on the workstation every time the user logs in? It looked like it worked the 1st time I logged in to my workstation, but then I deleted the device from the printers/devices page on my workstation. When I log back in, the device does not come back. Does this mean that if a user deletes the deployed printer, it will never come back via the printer deployment policy? How can I make it so that the policy will replace the deleted printer the next time a user logs in?
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Question by:ShiftAltNumlock
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Spyder2010 earned 500 total points
ID: 39819351
Are you pushing your printer to a group of users or computers?  We have our printer GPOs set up to deploy printers to user groups, and they refresh the list every time a user logs on, or each time group policy updates(max 2hours). You should be able to delete a GPO deployed printer from the machine, log off then back on(or do a gpupdate /force), and the printer should come back.

Not positive about it if you are pushing to a computer object rather than user... would need to do some testing with that, but I would assume it would work the same way.
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Author Closing Comment

by:ShiftAltNumlock
ID: 39819414
Yes, I discovered that if I did a gpupdate /force, the printer would be back again. I would assume that if I would have just waited for the default policy refresh, it would have given the same results. I am good with this.

BTW: I had policy applied to a user ou.
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