Solved

Cycle through Access public variables with common names

Posted on 2014-01-29
4
271 Views
Last Modified: 2014-01-30
I have a form with a series of common named controls that I want to update to the storerd values in similarly named public globals.

I want to set this up as a "for" loop  as I have a lot of field variables and have the syntax for the form fields as:
For i = 1 To 10
        Me("txtTextBox" & i).Value
    Next i

How do I structure global variable?
  The below is kind of what I want but obviously is incorrect syntax
Me("txtTextBox" & i).Value = pubText & i
0
Comment
Question by:ynot8669
  • 2
4 Comments
 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger) earned 250 total points
ID: 39820023
Declare your public variables as an array:

Public pubText(1 to 10) As String

Open in new window

This gives you 10 variables called pubText(1)...pubText(10)

Use them the following way:

Me("txtTextBox" & i).Value = pubText(i)

Open in new window

0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:ynot8669
ID: 39820059
Great, you have confirmed where my thinking was going.

I couldn't make any other syntax work ........and tried quite few.

Thank You :)
0
 
LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:Dale Fye (Access MVP)
ID: 39820659
The other option, depending on the version of Access you are using, is to use TempVars.

TempVars is a collection of variables that you do not need to declare (dimension) and which can contain virtually anything.  To create a tempvar, simply use the syntax:

Tempvar.Add  "variableName", value

Note: I've also found that you can simply do:Tempvar!variableName = x

Then, you could use either of the following to refer to that variable.

TempVars!strAppName
TempVars.Item("strAppName")
TempVars.Item(0)

Advantages of tempvars are:
a.  the collection retains its values, even outside the scope of your code, even after encountering an unhandled error.
b.  You can actually refer to the variable by name
c.  you can use them in queries, which you cannot do directly with public variables.  I find this valuable in that I don't have to refer to form controls in my queries.  In the after update event of a control, say txtStartDate, I'll simply set the value of the tempvar:

Private sub txtStartDate_AfterUpdate

    if me.txtStartDate & "" = "" then
        'do nothing
   else
        Tempvars!StartDate = cdate(me.txtStartDate.Value)
   end if

End Sub

Then, in my queries, I can refer to tempvar!StartDate rather than referring to a form field.  This gives me the ability to set tempvars in the immediate window and test queries that would otherwise return nothing or use a popup for data entry.

Hope this helps.
0
 

Author Comment

by:ynot8669
ID: 39822769
Thanks Dale, I have used TempVars for most global variables but wasn't aware of the .item(x) access method.

I'm assuming you can vary (x) within a loop, if so it may well work out to be the way forward.
0

Featured Post

Enterprise Mobility and BYOD For Dummies

Like “For Dummies” books, you can read this in whatever order you choose and learn about mobility and BYOD; and how to put a competitive mobile infrastructure in place. Developed for SMBs and large enterprises alike, you will find helpful use cases, planning, and implementation.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

The first two articles in this short series — Using a Criteria Form to Filter Records (http://www.experts-exchange.com/A_6069.html) and Building a Custom Filter (http://www.experts-exchange.com/A_6070.html) — discuss in some detail how a form can be…
Overview: This article:       (a) explains one principle method to cross-reference invoice items in Quickbooks®       (b) explores the reasons one might need to cross-reference invoice items       (c) provides a sample process for creating a M…
Show developers how to use a criteria form to limit the data that appears on an Access report. It is a common requirement that users can specify the criteria for a report at runtime. The easiest way to accomplish this is using a criteria form that a…
In Microsoft Access, learn the trick to repeating sub-report headings at the top of each page. The problem with sub-reports and headings: Add a dummy group to the sub report using the expression =1: Set the “Repeat Section” property of the dummy…

920 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

14 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now