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Combine text values and numerical values but avoid the "#VALUE!" alert

Posted on 2014-01-29
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Last Modified: 2014-02-08
Hello,

Is there a way to perform numerical functions in Excel (2013) when text values are included and avoid the "#VALUE!" alert? I generally try to write formulas so that a backtick "`" appears when no result is obtained. It's small and unobtrusive and perfect, imo, as a reminder that a formula is in that cell. However, in many cases I end up with a bunch of big "#VALUE!" alerts which I wish could be replaced by something more subtle.

As an example, I have attached a spreadsheet from which the below screenshot is taken. By the way, my question has nothing whatsoever to do with the displayed formula (which is for breaking down a number into its single digits regardless of how many digits the number contains) but rather, how to avoid the "#VALUE!" alerts.

In the first two examples, the block of cells with borders contains the same formula. In each case, the formula is shown for the cell shaded orange. In Example #3, the block was filled manually because a formula which will provide those results is what I'm after.

Fig. 1In all three examples, Column J contains a =Sum() formula which is shown in blue.

The =SUM() function works fine if the defined range includes text values and I can always change text numbers to numerical numbers by enclosing the result in a =VALUE() function. However, trying to combine the two processes is like mixing oil & water  — they do not cohabitate serenely. :P

Thanks

2014-01-29-EE.xlsx
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Question by:Steve_Brady
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Assisted Solution

by:Rgonzo1971
Rgonzo1971 earned 50 total points
ID: 39820048
Hi,

pls try

=IFERROR(VALUE(MID($C14,LEN($C14)-E$3;1)),"`")

Open in new window

Regards
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Assisted Solution

by:Gozreh
Gozreh earned 50 total points
ID: 39820058
I fixed by example 2


=IF(LEN($C14)<=E$3,"`",VALUE(MID($C14,LEN($C14)-E$3,1)))
2014-01-29-EE.xlsx
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Accepted Solution

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byundt earned 400 total points
ID: 39820070
Since you have Excel 2010 or later, you can use the AGGREGATE function instead of SUM. AGGREGATE has the ability to ignore error values. For example:
=SUM($E14:$H14)               returns #VALUE! error value if one of the cells contains #VALUE!
=AGGREGATE(9,6,$E14:$H14)         returns the sum while ignoring any error values

Also, for returning the sum of the digits, you might consider a formula like:
=SUM(--MID(TEXT(A1,"000000"),{1,2,3,4,5,6},1))
This formula works for numbers up to six digits in length.
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Expert Comment

by:MrBullwinkle
ID: 39820837
You can also format a cell so the forecolor and backcolor match, hiding the text when there's an error.

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/excel-help/hide-error-values-and-error-indicators-in-cells-HP010342572.aspx#_Toc249865016
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Author Closing Comment

by:Steve_Brady
ID: 39844544
Thanks
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