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Shareing an access database

Posted on 2014-01-30
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Last Modified: 2014-02-04
I have created a database that links to excel spread sheets.  

If I zip up the database and the excel spread sheets and send them to someone else the database does not work, it says it can not find the files and states a path that is on my computer ( this error message comes from someone elses computer ).


I want to be able to send a copy of my access 2010 database and the linked excel files to another user.  

we do have sharepoint however we do not have control of it and I do not think we have the access database extensions.

How do I send the database and data to my team when we do not have control of the network ( high security )
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Question by:TIMFOX123
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6 Comments
 
LVL 38

Assisted Solution

by:Jim P.
Jim P. earned 250 total points
ID: 39823136
With a Win7 machine you can put the Excel files in C:\Users\Public\Documents or WinXP it would be C:\Doucments and Settings\All Users\  folders and then link to them there.

Then when you send the documents the links will be universal. That would be a quick and dirty that should work.

You can also build a whole function to relink the files. It isn't that hard. But the answer depends on what you want to do.
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LVL 85

Accepted Solution

by:
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 250 total points
ID: 39823579
Note too that Win7 requires that you put the database in a Trusted Location. If you don't, your code won't run.

Personally, I'd put the files in the same folder and then recreate the link at startup, as Jim P. suggests. That way you always know where the file will be, and can always get to it.

Note too that you generally should not use the [Program Files] folder on a Win7 machine, since UAC will make that folder not writeable. Instead, install your database to one of the Documents folders (either All Users, if everyone needs it, or to a specific User Documents fodler if only one user needs it).
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Author Closing Comment

by:TIMFOX123
ID: 39831380
All good answers but in our locked down  environment Microsoft has made a jail we can not work in.

Well time to reinvent the wheel with a bash script and the join command
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LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:Jim P.
ID: 39831389
Well time to reinvent the wheel with a bash script and the join command.

Sorry we couldn't give you a better answer. But could you import to the backend and link to that?
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Author Comment

by:TIMFOX123
ID: 39831403
Jim

thank you so much for your good reply and the "problem" is not yours.  We are locked down and getting locked down more every day.  

Really can not say more than that.  Just trust me on this :)
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LVL 85
ID: 39832124
Windows 7 UAC has cause quite a bit of frustration, if that's what you're referring to. In many cases, however, it's really just MSFT enforcing "rules" that have been in place for years (but poorly enforced).

A good example is the [Program Files] folder. This was always intended as a "read only" location, but programmers quickly discovered it was read/write, so they dropped everything in there. Access databases require read/write/create/destroy permissions on their host folder, so when UAC locked that down many applications that worked previously began to fail. Not really MSFT's fault, in my opinion, but rather the developer who chose to install their Access database in a location that was not guaranteed to be read/write (and I did exactly that on several installs, and have had to rework my app to work properly with UAC).
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