Gzip performance

When I run the audit of chrome it says:

Compressing the following resources with gzip could reduce their transfer size by about two thirds (~58.3¿KB):

Do you believe does  it worth to make a necessary change? If I do it do the users will feel the difference?

Thank you
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myyisAsked:
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Dave BaldwinConnect With a Mentor Fixer of ProblemsCommented:
That is probably Not what you think it is.  It does not mean that You should Gzip the files but that the server should Gzip the transmission if the browser puts 'gzip' in it's 'accept' line in the request headers.  You can go to this site to see if your server is providing compression when requested: http://www.whatsmyip.org/http-compression-test/   If it is Not, then you have to tell the server to do it.  Gzipping the files yourself will just confuse the process.
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myyisAuthor Commented:
I did the test,
says  "is NOT Compressed"

Page Size: 82.3 KB
Compressed Page Size: 22.4 KB
Potential Savings: 72.8%
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
I suggest you contact your hosting company and ask them to enable compression.  Apache and IIS web servers have different methods of doing that.
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gr8gonzoConnect With a Mentor ConsultantCommented:
Like Dave mentioned, gzip compression on web pages means something a little different. Basically, after the HTML (or whatever content) is loaded up into memory, the web server can then compress the contents and THEN send the compressed version to the browser. Almost all modern browsers have the ability do decompress the data and then handle the normal, decompressed stuff as if the compression had never happened.

There are two common downsides to gzip compression on web pages:

1. It eats up a little bit of CPU on the server because it requires the CPU to run the compression algorithms before the data can be sent.

2. Compression requires the ENTIRE page to finish being generated on the server before it can start (because compression is about analyzing the full contents to figure out the best way of compressing it), and it also requires the FULL file to be downloaded before decompression can start, so this means you can't stream gzipped compressed content. It has to finish loading, finish compressing, finish downloading, and finish decompressing before the browser sees any HTML at all.

Of course, if you have any bandwidth limitations on your account, then compression can definitely help you conserve that bandwidth (which is also usually good for the internet as a whole, too).
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