Solved

laptop GPU overheated- should I install a copper shim on the new motherboards gpu?

Posted on 2014-02-03
8
2,327 Views
Last Modified: 2016-11-23
Hi, my friend has a dell laptop and last year the GPU overheated and the screens display was all distorted. I removed the motherboard and heated the GPU and reinstalled the board and that fixed it but the problem occured again. My friend had me order a replacment motherboard this time and I was wondering if maybe I should remove the purple foam padding on the heat sync and change it with a copper shim instead so the new motherboard does not also overheat. Or would I be best off just keeping the factory padding installed? Below is a photo of the area I am talking about.

pic
0
Comment
Question by:hydrive1902
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • +2
8 Comments
 
LVL 19

Assisted Solution

by:regmigrant
regmigrant earned 125 total points
ID: 39830595
If your friend is using the laptop normally and not blocking air vents (eg: using it on carpet or soft furnishing) then it shouldn't overheat and fiddling with the design in this way has a lot of potential to make things worse.

I would suggest you source a new heatsink and use that according to Dell's instructions
0
 
LVL 48

Accepted Solution

by:
dbrunton earned 125 total points
ID: 39830614
Shimming is a debatable topic.  The padding is designed to take care of inconsistencies between the heatsinks and the top of the CPU/GPU; they are probably at different heights and the pad takes care of the differences between them.

If you introduce the shim you might be increasing or decreasing the height difference.  Or you might be changing the angle of contact between the heatsink and the top of the CPU/GPU (this could be better or worse).

The shimming may or may not distribute the heat better to the heatsink.  If you've read claims that it will take care.

------------------------------

Now you've said the GPU on the old motherboard overheated and you reheated and fixed it that way.  The reheating is a temporary fix at the best of times as you've found out.  Now what makes you think it overheated?  It may just have been a poor soldering connection that the reheat fixed.
0
 
LVL 34

Assisted Solution

by:Dan Craciun
Dan Craciun earned 125 total points
ID: 39830620
From your picture I see too much thermal compound on your GPU (if that's your GPU, I can't tell). Put just a thin layer of quality thermal compound (I like Arctic Silver 5, but that's old and there are better out there).
Then make sure that the heatsink has proper contact with the chip, so it can dissipate heat. A copper contact could be a good idea, if you know what you're doing.

@regmigrant: manufacturers do mess up thermals from time to time, as most owners of HP DV laptops can tell you.

HTH,
Dan
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:hydrive1902
ID: 39830816
thank you everyone. Ok I will not use a shim because I agree that it could be the wrong thickness and throw something off balance, I have just one more question. The old board has some very hard solid paste over the GPU (dan craciun-that is what you saw) and on the new board there is no paste. Should I use some artic silver 5 on the new GPU? I know I should use it on the CPU but not sure if I should also put some on the GPU as well because I did not think any paste was required if using the pink pads. Any sugestions?
0
Ransomware-A Revenue Bonanza for Service Providers

Ransomware – malware that gets on your customers’ computers, encrypts their data, and extorts a hefty ransom for the decryption keys – is a surging new threat.  The purpose of this eBook is to educate the reader about ransomware attacks.

 
LVL 48

Expert Comment

by:dbrunton
ID: 39830855
Clean off the old paste with something like Artic Clean http://www.arcticsilver.com/arcticlean.htm

Now as for using thermal paste instead of pads read http://forums.evga.com/tm.aspx?m=1874642  Lots of stuff in that thread.

If the pad is designed to take up the difference between the heatsink surface and the top of the CPU/GPU then use the pad and not the paste.  Now we can't tell what your manufacturer intended with your laptop.  Ease of assembly for thermal pads, sure.  But thermal paste may just work OK.  Or not.
0
 
LVL 91

Assisted Solution

by:nobus
nobus earned 125 total points
ID: 39831814
i have had several HP laptops with GPU problems, and i used a heat gun to reflowthe chip -
all of them worked again
of course if your GPU has become bad -  it won't be cured by this, or another method
if you need more info - just say so

***i tried the shims also - but that did not work -  for obvious reasons
0
 
LVL 1

Author Closing Comment

by:hydrive1902
ID: 39877799
thanks everyone for your ideas
0
 
LVL 91

Expert Comment

by:nobus
ID: 39878882
hydrive, did you use one of the methods?
0

Featured Post

Complete VMware vSphere® ESX(i) & Hyper-V Backup

Capture your entire system, including the host, with patented disk imaging integrated with VMware VADP / Microsoft VSS and RCT. RTOs is as low as 15 seconds with Acronis Active Restore™. You can enjoy unlimited P2V/V2V migrations from any source (even from a different hypervisor)

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

I'm a big fan of Windows' offline folder caching and have used it on my laptops for over a decade.  One thing I don't like about it, however, is how difficult Microsoft has made it for the cache to be moved out of the Windows folder.  Here's how to …
This is about my first experience with programming Arduino.
Along with being a a promotional video for my three-day Annielytics Dashboard Seminor, this Micro Tutorial is an intro to Google Analytics API data.
Video by: Mark
This lesson goes over how to construct ordered and unordered lists and how to create hyperlinks.

863 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

23 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now