Solved

MSSQL PIVOT TABLE

Posted on 2014-02-04
4
497 Views
Last Modified: 2014-02-04
Hello,
I have a query that give a result that I have to pivot.
I'm really new to pivot for mssql , so getting a little disappointed....
thanks for your help

here the query

SELECT ID_SERVICE,ID_DROIT,CODE_REVENDEUR from fn_function('8909' )
ORDER BY ORDRE_SERVICE,ORDRE_DROIT

the result, and the expected result is in the attached file.

thanks for any help .

regards.
PIVOT.xlsx
0
Comment
Question by:bruno_boccara
4 Comments
 
LVL 39

Expert Comment

by:lcohan
ID: 39833456
SELECT ID_SERVICE,
            ID_DROIT,
        [1] AS [1st],
        [2] AS [2nd],
        [3] AS [3rd],
        [4] AS [4th],
        [5] AS [5th],
        [6] AS [6th],
            [7] AS [7th]
   FROM (SELECT ID_SERVICE,ID_DROIT,CODE_REVENDEUR FROM fn_function('8909'))  AS src --(1)
  PIVOT (SUM(CODE_REVENDEUR) FOR ID_DROIT IN ([1],[2],[3],[4],[5],[6],[7])) AS pvt --(2)
  ORDER BY ORDRE_SERVICE,ORDRE_DROIT


--or like this if you want NULLs converted to 0

--===== Use a Pivot to do the same thing we did with the Cross Tab
 SELECT ID_SERVICE,
            ID_DROIT,
        COALESCE([1],0) AS [1st],
        COALESCE([2],0) AS [2nd],
        COALESCE([3],0) AS [3rd],
        COALESCE([4],0) AS [4th],
        COALESCE([5],0) AS [5th],
        COALESCE([6],0) AS [6th],
            COALESCE([7],0) AS [7th]
   FROM (SELECT ID_SERVICE,ID_DROIT,CODE_REVENDEUR FROM fn_function('8909'))  AS src --(1)
  PIVOT (SUM(CODE_REVENDEUR) FOR ID_DROIT IN ([1],[2],[3],[4],[5],[6],[7])) AS pvt --(2)
  ORDER BY ORDRE_SERVICE,ORDRE_DROIT
0
 
LVL 16

Accepted Solution

by:
Surendra Nath earned 500 total points
ID: 39833494
you can try the below code, leave the insert statements, they are there to create your test data.

drop table #t

CREATE TABLE  #T
(
ID_SERVICE	INT, ID_DROIT	INT, CODE_REVENDEUR INT
)

INSERT INTO #T VALUES(5,	1,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(5,	2,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(5,	3,	8909)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(5,	4,	8909)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(1,	1,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(1,	2,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(1,	3,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(1,	4,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(3,	1,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(3,	2,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(3,	3,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(3,	4,	8909)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(7,	1,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(7,	2,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(7,	3,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(7,	4,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(2,	1,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(2,	2,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(2,	3,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(2,	4,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(6,	1,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(6,	2,	8909)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(6,	3,	NULL)
INSERT INTO #T VALUES(6,	4,	NULL)

SELECT  ID_SERVICE,[1],[2],[3],[4]
FROM
(select   ID_SERVICE,ID_DROIT,CODE_REVENDEUR FROM #T) P 
PIVOT
(
AVG(CODE_REVENDEUR) FOR ID_DROIT IN ([1],[2],[3],[4])
) as PVT

-- the above code works only when the ID_DROIT has the values of 1,2,3 and 4, if that is not the case and if they can have more values then you can use the dynamic pivot as given below 

DECLARE @SQL        NVARCHAR(MAX)
DECLARE @ColList    NVARCHAR(MAX)
SET @ColList = (SELECT STUFF((SELECT ',' + '[' + CAST(ID_DROIT AS VARCHAR) + ']' FROM  (SELECT DISTINCT ID_DROIT FROM #T ) A FOR XML PATH('')),1,1,'')) 

SET @SQL = 'SELECT  ID_SERVICE, ' + @ColList 
+ 'FROM
(select   ID_SERVICE,ID_DROIT,CODE_REVENDEUR FROM #T) P 
PIVOT
(
AVG(CODE_REVENDEUR) FOR ID_DROIT IN ('
+ @ColList 
+ ')
) as PVT'

EXEC (@SQL)

Open in new window

0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:Sharath
ID: 39833508
try this.
SELECT * 
  FROM Test
 PIVOT(MAX(CODE_REVENDEUR) FOR ID_DROIT IN ([1],[2],[3],[4]) ) AS P

Open in new window

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!3/61950/3
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:bruno_boccara
ID: 39833999
MANY THANKS.

great solution.
0

Featured Post

Best Practices: Disaster Recovery Testing

Besides backup, any IT division should have a disaster recovery plan. You will find a few tips below relating to the development of such a plan and to what issues one should pay special attention in the course of backup planning.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

If you have heard of RFC822 date formats, they can be quite a challenge in SQL Server. RFC822 is an Internet standard format for email message headers, including all dates within those headers. The RFC822 protocols are available in detail at:   ht…
For both online and offline retail, the cross-channel business is the most recent pattern in the B2C trade space.
Viewers will learn how to use the SELECT statement in SQL to return specific rows and columns, with various degrees of sorting and limits in place.
Viewers will learn how to use the SELECT statement in SQL and will be exposed to the many uses the SELECT statement has.

809 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question