bubbles in TFT/LED monitor screens

Off late we are getting bubbles on the said monitor screens especially on the ones which are in Operation theater. We feel it is because of fumigation chemicals used in the OT.

Can any expert suggest the best way to reduce/minimize this issue . This is very critical as we are having around 15 to 20 monitors in all OTS and we need to find a solution asap.

(We cannot avoid fumigation in OT)
venkataramanaiahsrAsked:
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frankhelkConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Sorry, I can't recommend any monitors. My answers came just from my knowledge as engineer.

But I've just tried to google for "military grade tft monitor" and got a lot of results.

The first pointed to http://www.vartechsystems.com. Have a look on that site (and the other results) to get an idea about what's on the market. If you drop them (and/or some other vendors) a message with some details about your problem, the needed size, the number of displays and the used fumigation chemicals, they would surely give you an answer if they can supply resistant equipment and what cost you have to expect.

Addition: A search for "chemical resistant monitor" would give you as much results, possibly more tailored to your needs.
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frankhelkCommented:
I presume "bubbles" describe some damage of the front surface fo the display area ?

If beauty is no a concern, I'd try to seal off the monitor surface from the air - i.e. glue a thin layer of glass onto the front (not to the immediate surface, but to the surrounding case border, leaving some space in between). Use silicone sealing for gluing, making the seam airtight.

You'll have to ensure proper cooling ...

More sophisticated, you'll have to seal off the monitors behind a window or in an glass casing, ventilated with clean air.

Minimalistic approach: Tune the air condition / ventilation intake so that the monitors are immediately in the flow of fresh air. That would not entirely seal them off from pollution, but lower the exposition and slow the damage.

Another approach: Use monitors for rough industrial environments.
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
If the chemicals are affecting the display, then they are also being deposited on the internal electronics.  If they are at all toxic or act like solvents, you will probably have to replace all the monitors after a while because of damage to the internal electronics.  That probably applies to the computers too.
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venkataramanaiahsrAuthor Commented:
since we cannot avoid fumigation inside the OT( we have 5 to 6 OTs in the hospital and each OT has around 5 to 6 TFT Monitor), is there any we can do damage control for the ones which are not affected by fumigation till now. some kind of covering for the monitor during the duration of fumigation
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frankhelkCommented:
OK - that info helps a bit.

Just an unreflected idea out of my engineer's mind:

OT's usually have a supply of compressed air. Prepare a hose for each monitor with a regulation valve, connected to the compressed air supply. Mount it permanently with the outlet immediately near the monitor.

Prepare plastic bags big enough to cover an entire monitor. Prior to fumigation, slip the bags over the monitors, seal them by winding some tape or a cable binder around it where the cables go out - the sealing must not be airight, it should allow some leakage. Turn on the compressed air valves, thereby creating a directed flow of clean air into the bags and out of the leak. Tune the valve to a airstream that ensures a sufficient airflow to keep the air in the bags fresh.

After fumigation just peal the bags off the monitors and ready you are.

I see only one problem:

If you seal off the monitors while fumigating, you prevent the monitors themselves from being fumigated. I know that this is the effect you'll need, but I don't know if it is allowed to have unfumigated equipment in the OT. But that is a basic problem you can't circumvent with any kind of temporary cover. The only way aoround that would be to exchange the monitors (at least after failure of each separate one) with fumigation resistant types.
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venkataramanaiahsrAuthor Commented:
Is there any specific fumigation resistant monitor.  if so can u suggest any vendor for the same
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frankhelkCommented:
I presume you've found some suitable offers for new monitors ?
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