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Virtual Firewall security question

I am currently in the process of switching from a Barracuda load balancer to an F5 load balancer. During my discussion with F5 I found that their load balancing device also has the capability to function as a firewall.

After reviewing the feature set their firewall had to offer I am interested in making the switch. However, the F5 device is virtualized and I am nervous about relying on a virtual firewall instead of a physical.
 
My main concern is the server (ESXi) that would be housing the firewall/load balancer vm would also be housing other virtual machines. I understand that I can utilize VMWare’s vSwitches to logically separate the incoming public traffic from my private traffic, but I don’t fully understand the security consequences that would have. Could traffic hop from one vSwitch to another bypassing the firewall? What are other possibilities I should consider? What type of settings should I make sure are in place before implementing this setup? Or is it just a bad idea and I shouldn’t do it?
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JTD_PS
Asked:
JTD_PS
1 Solution
 
ArronGCommented:
It depends on your requirements.
In some systems I have set up this type is not allowed as firewalls must be a physically separate entity from the infrastructure as per regulations.
However, if you're not a regulated business then in the VMware scenario you describe this is logical separation.
As long as you get you vSwitches and virtual networks setup correctly and ensure routing between virtual networks isn't in place then you should be ok.
Also, physical NIC's can be assigned to VMware which is secure when done correctly.
F5 have pretty good devices and they are a major VMware partner with a good tech team.
You should be able to lean on F5 for support in installation by making sure it's segregated.

ArronG
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