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Group text fields so they grow together in a report

Posted on 2014-02-06
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Last Modified: 2014-02-11
Hello Experts,

I'm creating an Access 2007 report that has fields that need to grow identical to each other.  So if one field grows they all need to grow to match the hight of the tallest field.  

I have attached an example of what it currently looks like.  Again, all columns height should be the same as field 2's height.

How can I accomplish this?

Thanks!
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Question by:CompTech810
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LVL 84
ID: 39838952
2007 introduced the concept of "anchoring" controls, which means you can tell those controls to grow/stretch as needed. To do that, open the report in Design view and select the control, then select Arrange tab - Size - Anchoring. There are multiple choices, and you may have to select one or more to get what you want.

See this MSFT article: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/access-help/make-controls-stretch-shrink-or-move-as-you-resize-a-form-HA010253986.aspx
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by:CompTech810
ID: 39839009
The anchoring works for forms but not reports.  At least when I open the report in design, select the arrange tab, then size, anchoring isn't an option.  I tried opening a form and doing the same thing and the anchoring option is there.
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CompTech810 earned 0 total points
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I opted to have the text font change based on the amout of text.

Here is a link to the code I used.  http://www.lebans.com/toc.htm
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by:CompTech810
ID: 39849661
Found an alternate solution.
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