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how to see original table name after alias in query

Posted on 2014-02-06
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Last Modified: 2014-02-08
hey guys, in my queries i use aliases to name my tables / sub queries. i do this by going to the property pane (pressing F4) and then type in the name i want in the Alias field.

however sometimes i want to see which table / sub query i'm using in that query and i don't know what's the name by just looking at the alias. so i need to see the original table name.

Question: how do i see the original table / sub query name?

the only way i know how to do it is to go to SQL design mode and read from the SQL. surely there is a better way right? thanks in advance guys! = )
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Question by:developingprogrammer
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by:PatHartman
PatHartman earned 100 total points
ID: 39841064
Nope.  Open the SQL view.
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DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft MVP, Access and Data Platform) earned 274 total points
ID: 39841111
This is a way (see image below)
Turn on Object Dependencies on the Database Tools ribbon.
Open the Object Dependencies dialog.
Then, with the query opened or closed, select the query in the Navigation pane.
In the OD dialog,  select "Objects that I depend on"
This will show your actual Table

Alias
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LVL 75
ID: 39841115
Important side note:
When you enable Object Dependencies, this turns on Name AutoCorrectOptions>> Track Name AutoCorrect info. However, there are some know issues with having NAC on - ESPECIALLY if Perform name AutoCorrect is also checked (bad, bad, bad, no no no). Fortunately, OD does not force this setting on.
Allen Browne lists the issues on his site.

So ... you may not want to leave this on indefinitely - especially if the db is deployed, because NAC Options are 'Current Database' options, and thus go WITH the db - where ever it may end up.

mx
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by:Gustav Brock
Gustav Brock earned 126 total points
ID: 39841242
For that same reason I never use alias in Access SQL (except, of course, where they are a must).

/gustav
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ID: 39841277
When is it a must ?
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by:Gustav Brock
Gustav Brock earned 126 total points
ID: 39841282
When you link to the same table twice or to itself.

/gustav
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LVL 75
ID: 39842650
:-)
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by:developingprogrammer
ID: 39843591
whao Joe, i never knew about the object dependencies pane! it is really so so powerful! i can just think of so many ways it will help me / i can use it now = ))

thanks gustav for pointing out when to use Alias and thanks Pat too for your help and sharing! = )
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LVL 75
ID: 39843619
Not a big deal, but ... I'm a tad confused. The answer
"Nope.  Open the SQL view."
... is well, just wrong :-(

mx
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Author Comment

by:developingprogrammer
ID: 39843795
hrmm i think Pat was trying to say other than object dependencies, there is no way to see the full table name in the design window. the object dependencies window is kinda like a separate super charged thing ha = )
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LVL 75
ID: 39843809
seems like a stretch.
Nope = No :-(
She made no mention of the OD window.
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Expert Comment

by:PatHartman
ID: 39844294
You could also look in MSysQueries but I was under the impression the OP wanted something convenient.  I haven't spent any time analyzing the format of MSysQueries but it looks like Name1 is the table/query name and Name2 is the Alias.

You could create your own query/table cross reference without having to turn on name autocorrect by using MSysQueries.
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