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Windows 7 on an XP machine

Posted on 2014-02-07
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Last Modified: 2014-02-08
Hi, I have several laptops some of which have Windows XP and the newest one has Windows 7.  I DON'T like working with Windows 7.  I would prefer to use XP on my new machine so here is the question;
Can I have someone take the disc from one of my XP machines and install it on my Windows 7 machine?  If so, how much power/speed will I lose given that Windows 7 is 64 bit vs XP 32 bit?  Will that have a significant effect (slow things down)?  Is it a smart thing to do or not?
Thanks
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Question by:camtz
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by:aadih
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Going backwards (to a soon obsolete OS) is unwise. <An opinion only.>
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by:camtz
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Sorry, the title should read Windows XP on an Windows 7 machine.
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by:aadih
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The comment (opinion) stands. Moving all XP's to Windows 7 is the answer. And wise.
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by:alexgreen312
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Ok well,

Ignoring the people who aren't exactly helping. You can do the following, rebuild the hard drive with windows XP and then go to the manufacturers for the XP drivers.

I wouldn't recommend taking the disk out of your windows XP machine and putting it into your windows 7 machine mainly because of the driver differences.

If you give me the details of your new machine I'm sure I can get most of the drivers, the hardest issue is going to be if you're running a new chipset, I may not be able to get things like onboard audio but I'll give it a shot.

As for the version of XP, go with professional 64bit. I'm sure you can find a copy somewhere.

And by the way, I'd have gone with windows XP if it had DirectX11 as well as being able to reference 32GB of memory correctly.

Regards

Alex
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by:web_tracker
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Windows xp is soon to be an obsolete operating system, MS will no longer be supporting it, starting in April. There will be no more updates created for the operating system, if the computer is connected to the internet at all the xp machines will be voluneable, to malware/virus infections. If you insist on installing xp anyway, you maybe able to use the disc from another laptop if it is the same brand, ie if both laptops are Dell you can use the same Dell disc to install the xp operating system on the windows 7 machine, but you will probably not be able to activate it unless you have a unique disc. Moving from a 64 bit operating system to a 32 bit operating system will significantly cause the system to run slower. A 64 bit operating system handles 64 bits of information at one time, while a 32 bit operating system will handle only 32. That does not mean that it will be twice as slow as there are other factors involved in handling data in chunks.
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by:aadih
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Ignoring the people who aren't exactly helping. ~alexgreen312

Ignoring realities is help?  Help has many forms. Ignore the messenger, of course, but not the message. [That is: Throw the bathwater, by all means, but keep the baby.] :-)
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by:alexgreen312
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Don't get me wrong, I can understand why he wants to keep XP, much smaller foot print, uses less resources, easier to use.

I use windows 7 at home, but windows XP was great. Given the fact he's asked "How to put windows XP on a windows 7 Machine" rather than "Tell me all the reasons I shouldn't put windows XP on a windows 7 machine" we should probably just answer the question he's asked.

Given the fact that's he's been a member here since 2005 and asked a number of questions relating to IT.  I'm pretty sure he's got a valid reason for wanting windows XP.
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by:web_tracker
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I know first hand working at the university that there are many pieces of lab equipment that do not play nicely with windows 7, but then one may say you can always run xp mode in the windows 7 operating system, but if a system is older it may not be able to handle running both windows 7 and windows xp mode.  So I guess there may be valid reasons for going to xp, but it is not a machine I would want connected to the internet as soon as xp is no longer been supported hackers will most likely be exploiting the holes in the operating system that MS has been constantly patching. Of course not everyone has the latest updates for windows xp and they are still running fine, but I guess it is a matter of time by visiting an infected site that the person's system becomes infected.
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by:marsilies
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The OP asked "Is it a smart thing to do or not?" so offering reasons not to do it is entirely withing is scope of what was asked.

Some issues with downgrading Windows 7 64-bit to 32-bit XP:

The biggest is that Microsoft is discontinuing extended support for XP on April 8, 2014, meaning no more security updates. Given the proliferation of zero-day exploits, the lack fo security updates will make it especially vulnerable to malware. Most people are recommending the opposite and suggesting everyone upgrade their XP machines to a newer version of Windows by April:
http://www.technibble.com/windows-xp-support-ends-in-april-2014-what-technicians-need-to-know/

Once Microsoft drops support, expect other software vendors to gradually drop support. You eventually won't be able to upgrade your web browser or other software, making it even more vulnerable to malware.

Another potential problem is going from 64-bit to 32-bit. If your laptop has 4GB of RAM or more, installing a 32-bit OS means you won't be able to access all the RAM. Also, programs will be limited to only 2GB of memory space each.

Another issue is licensing. You'll need a license and key in order to install and activate Windows XP. If the laptop came with Windows 7 Pro/Ulitmate, it includes "downgrade" rights. However, if it came with a Home Edition, you'll have to pay for a separate license and key. The XP installer disc you use will have to match the license and edition you have  a key for. You can't transfer OEM licenses from one laptop to another.



A better solution may be detailing what exactly you don't like about Windows 7 vs XP. There's a number of utilities and tools that can make Windows 7 look/act a bit more like XP. The biggest being Classic Shell:
http://www.classicshell.net/
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by:aadih
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I understood all the above when I first read the question. But thanks for your effort to explain, however. I do appreciate it. You mean well.

With deepest respect for the quesioner (and you): My initial comment stands and I stand by it.  :-)

(FWIW, Had he only one computer, I'd have advised him on how to 'go back to XP'. As he has 'several' I chose not do so. Why? Because in my opinion I'd be helping him in harming himself rather than helping. <An opinion only.> And I like to offer what I consider the best help I am capable off, which, of course, is a matter of judgment.  Also, I knew for sure that others will advise him on how to do what he wants to do.)

[BTW, I know people who have decided to keep working with their Windows 98 and ME. Knowing exactly what they are using them for, I do advise them about some problems they run into. OTOH, I'd never advise them to go back to Windows 95 only because they don't like what they have now. Sorry. There is no going back in this technology -- practically speaking.]
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by:aadih
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A better solution may be detailing what exactly you don't like about Windows 7 vs XP. ~marsilies

Yes. It'd help tremendously to listen and know what is the real problem here. Then it becomes possible to offer the 'best' solution (or best alternatives). camtz will take that road, perhaps. As a customer, however, it's his choice that matters. Not ours.
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by:camtz
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WOW!!! - I didn't realize I was going to create such a stir. YOU ARE ALL CORRECT.  For one thing, I didn't know about the support issue in April - so I totally get it.  Not a wise decision. Now, The reasoning for not wanting to work with Windows 7 is just pure laziness on my part.  I haven't even figured out how to do a restore on Windows 7.  I don't like the way it displays the programs you have installed and lastly, I don't like the new control panel because of the many changes they made.

The reality is that I'l just have to take some time to familiarize myself with all the changes because you are all correct in that it would be very stupid to go from a model T Ford back to a horse which seems to be what you are all saying.  Now that we know where things stand, can someone please tell me a good source to go to to learn about the features of Windows 7 and how to use them.  Thanks so much.
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by:marsilies
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I'm not sure about the way the Start Menu lists the way the programs are installed, do you mean you preferred the branching trees that pop out? Because that's something the Classic Shell can do:
http://www.classicshell.net/features/

For Control Panel, just click on the "View By" option in the top right, and select  "Large Icons" or "Small Icons" to get a more XP-like listing.

As for a restore, do you mean a System Restore? Because that hadn't changed much from XP, from what I recall, except maybe the method to access it.
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/microsoft-help/archive/2010/02/21/system-restore-in-windows-xp-vista-and-7.aspx
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by:nobus
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as for drivers, you won't find much 64-bit XP drivers for new equipment.
you may have more drivers in the 32-bit version
also - upgrading IE on XP is not possible past IE8.

so yes, i agree on using classic shell with Windows 7, as said above
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by:aadih
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There's a number of utilities and tools that can make Windows 7 look/act a bit more like XP. The biggest being Classic Shell: http://www.classicshell.net/ ~ marsilies.

Use Classic Shell and a lot of your "new" start menu troubles will go away.

How to do a repair install of Windows 7? An excellent set of instructions can be found at:

< http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/3413-repair-install.html >

For all your difficulties (and learning about Windows 7) please use the above web site.
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by:camtz
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Many thanks for all your support.  I will check them all and begin the process.  I have just encounter a "bran new" problem.  I bought a music software program called SONAR X3 STUDIO and put the disc in the tray, selected the executable in the dialog and it started the installation.  In all three attempts, the green progression bar got about 65% across the screen and the computer would go into restart mode.  The installation never completed.  I double clicked on my computer and Cackewalk Content is listed with some files in it and it's also listed under Program Files however NOT listed under Programs and Features in the control panel.  I disabled AVG (my anti virus program) prior to installing so there is obviously something else interfering with the installation.  Question, should I treat this as a new question or can someone help me? Thanks
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by:aadih
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Post a new question.

Here is what you should do, however.

Restore your PC to a point in time before installing the music software program.  The recommended way is to boot up in safe mode with command prompt and type rstrui.exe to restore. After the PC is restored, scan it with Malwarebyteas Antimalware and TDSSKiller before trying to install the program again.

[Note: If you have Revo Uninstaller Pro, you could force uninstall the music program.]

(Also did you follow the instructions on its installation? Please take a note about 'all parts' at:

< http://www.cakewalk.com/support/kb/pages/x3_download_installation_instructions.aspx >)
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marsilies earned 200 total points
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Cakewalk SONAR X3 STUDIO supports both 64-bit Windows and Windows 7, so the problem isn't with the OS:
https://www.cakewalk.com/products/sonar/versions.aspx

I agree with aadih that if you keep having difficulty with that specific software you should open up a new question for it, as it doesn't really fall into the ground covered by this question thread.
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by:camtz
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Thanks to all of you.  It's been very educational and made me realize that I need to embrace the new technology and not run away from it.  In looking at the Shell program, I think it's going to make me more comfortable because it is so close to the look and feel of the XP model.  Thanks again
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by:aadih
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Great. You made up your mind. :-)
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