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SBS 2008 Replacement

I need to replace a SBS 2008 Premium installation which currently uses 2 Dell PE 110 servers one as a DC and the other for RDP. The customer uses RDP  to allow remote staff to access a custom Access DB and MS Office applications. The office is quite small with about 20 staff. I am interested on getting other's opinions as to the best way of replacing the SBS 2008 Server and the 2008 Standard server.

I think that the customer will consider using Office 365 for email, as now SBS is no longer available, an "on premises"  Exchange Server mail server becomes an expensive option.

I am also interested in other's opinions as to whether using virtualization to reduce the number of physical servers in this situation is likely to be a reasonable option and to be cost effective ?

Thanks

John
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jhswinson
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jhswinson
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1 Solution
 
Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
How many users?

One server with 8 2.5" 10K SAS in RAID 6 with a hardware RAID controller, non-volatile cache, and at least 64GB of RAM would be a good place to start.

2x Windows Server STD licenses, CALs, Exchange license, CALs (price may surprise you especially amortized over 36-48 months), and RDS CALs.

VM 1: DC, File, Print
VM 2: Exchange
VM 3: WSUS, LoBs
VM 4: RDS (RD Gateway, RDWeb, RemoteApp, and RDS services)

The above is our default configuration for on-premises and Hybrid depending on their needs.

IIS ARR (Application Request Routing) and URLReWrite take care of publishing multiple services (remote.domain.com mail.domain.com sharepoint.domain.com) via one single WAN IP (a very elegant solution I might add ;) ).

I believe on-premises would be a strong contender depending on the industry they are in. Purchase up-front may look costly but no monthly nut if another crunch comes down the pipe. Plus, the data is theirs.

Philip
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jhswinsonAuthor Commented:
There are 20 users but 12 of them use Macs so only require email. Unfortunately money is not unlimited and  In comparison with previous SBS solutions this would be very expensive!
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Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
Not really: http://bit.ly/PDQ7Ck

We always run with Open Value Agreements for client licensing.

The cost difference is minimal relative to the number of users (cost/user/month amortized over 36-42 months). http://bit.ly/LD7z7e

Philip
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
The customer uses RDP  to allow remote staff to access a custom Access DB and MS Office applications

If you are already considering Office365, then you don't need to have a separate RDS Server for remote staff to access an Access DB and Office Applications.  That can all be done in Office 365 - for a lot less cost than deploying an RDS server.

Consider that you need the following when deploying a separate RDS Server:
1.  Server License (about $800)
2.  User CALs (about $30 each)
3.  RDS CALs (about $50 each)
4.  MS Office (about $400 per person -- cannot use retail or Home & Business versions)

So for 10 remote users you are looking at over $5,000.00 just in licensing costs.

There will be a bit of cost in migrating the Access database up to SharePoint, but it's certainly doable and will provide greater functionality.

Depending on which Office365 plan they go with, remote users can either have a full copy of Office Professional Plus to use locally or they can use Office WebApps.

You can then go with just a Server 2012 Essentials to handle the in-office management needs.  Macs are supported as client computers for a Server 2012 Essentials.

Additionally, Server 2012 Essentials gives you full management of your Office 365 Exchange Mailboxes from the server's management console.
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jhswinsonAuthor Commented:
The Access database utilises custom VBA extensively and interacts with external programs so I am not so sure that it would be possible to run on SharePoint. Also as it is core to my customer's business I would have a hard time convincing them to put it off site. The impression that I am getting is that if I want to implement RDS that I will need Server 2012 standard as a member server but that I could use Server 2012 Essentials as a Domain Controller.
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
Yes, that is the way to do it.

You would utilize the Standard Server license to install the Hyper-V Host and then install Essentials + Standard as VM's.  Your Host should run your backups and AV if you like but otherwise shouldn't do much else.

Jeff
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