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Add New Domain to Exchange 2010 but still route mail to external server

Posted on 2014-02-11
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Last Modified: 2014-02-16
We have purchased a company that currently is using SBS 2003 and has Exchange email accounts.

We are going to migrate them to our Exchange 2010 server.

In the mean time, I want to go ahead and start the setup of the mailboxes on the 2010 server but I'm afraid if I add the new domain and mailboxes to the server, the mail from internal users will go to the new mailboxes I've setup on the 2010 server.

Is there a way to avoid this as the migration is going to take a few days and I want the mail from internal users on the 2010 server to still go to the mailboxes on the 2003 server that users will still be using until completely migrated?

Thanks.
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Question by:rubendn
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by:colditzz
ID: 39851872
Hi rubendn,

I think the answer to your question is to perform the migration using PowerShell and specifically the 'SuspendWhenReadyToComplete' parameter.  Please see - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd351123.aspx - for more info.

Hope this helps.
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by:rubendn
ID: 39851876
The migration is going to be done manually and is small so I don't want to complicate with powershell.

I just want to see if there is a way to have everything setup and ready but instead of delivering email to xyz.com domain that is configured locally for it to go to where the mx record says it is.
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colditzz earned 250 total points
ID: 39851894
Not sure that PowerShell would complicate it, but I do see your point if it is not something you use often.

You could create all of the user accounts and then associate mailboxes locally without adding the external domain to the organisation.  This would enable them to (the mailboxes) to be created without interrupting the mail-flow to the existing domain.  When you are ready to go live with the new mailboxes, you would add the new domain to the organisation, ensure the relevant mailboxes have the correct SMTP addresses assigned and then modify the MX record.  This would mean all new users would have empty mailboxes to start and you would then have to do a manual export/import of their original mailboxes, via .pst files I would assume.

Hope this helps.
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Expert Comment

by:colditzz
ID: 39851903
In addition, I would also add a transport rule to the existing Exchange server forwarding any emails - that still get sent to the old server while you wait up to 24 hours for the DNS change to propagate - onwards to the new mailboxes on the other server, you may be able to designate the old server has 'non-authoritative' for the domain in question, i.e. it is aware of the domain but no longer hosts live mailboxes in the domain.

Cheers
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Assisted Solution

by:Gareth Gudger
Gareth Gudger earned 250 total points
ID: 39852133
I think your best bet is to set up a new Accepted Domain on your Exchange 2010 server and configure it as an Internal Relay Domain. It the mailbox exists on your server it will deliver it there. If it does not exist on your server, it will deliver it to the 2003 server instead.

You will also need to configure a Send  Connector.

This is called a Shared Address Space. Reference here.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb676395(v=exchg.141).aspx
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Author Closing Comment

by:rubendn
ID: 39852164
Both answers offer ways to do what I need to do.  I will probably go with the first one (colditzz) since it I have a small amount of mailboxes being migrated but the second answer (diggisaur) is probably the proper way to do it for the question I asked.
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by:Gareth Gudger
ID: 39852170
Awesome. Glad we were able to help!
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by:colditzz
ID: 39862739
Thank you, and to echo diggisaur, I'm glad we were able to help.
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