Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people, just like you, are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
Solved

Upgrading a PC using VM to Hardware Migration

Posted on 2014-02-12
5
158 Views
Last Modified: 2016-10-27
Trying to upgrade a PC from Windows 7 x64 to Windows 8.1 x64.  I typically like fresh install OS, no matter what. Given that in the process of a fresh install many personalized settings and files may be lost, I was wondering if there is a way to utilize VM to install the new OS without any impact to the physical hardware or current OS, setup the VM with the various personal APPS / software that we need, and with the ability to switch back and forth between the physical OS and the VM OS to carbon copy personal files, settings and etc..

Once we have a fully functional VM that is satisfactory, then migrate it to the physical hardware of the PC.  

Is this possible?

Any problems, issues or precautions?

How would I go about doing it?
0
Comment
Question by:esabet
  • 3
  • 2
5 Comments
 
LVL 119

Accepted Solution

by:
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 500 total points
ID: 39854575
It is possible, you can use a VMware Hypervisor

VMware Player 6.0 Free Download [FREE]
http://www.vmware.com/go/downloadplayer/

VMware Workstation 10.0 (60 day trial, $199) [EVALUATION]
www.vmware.com/go/downloadworkstation

tor create your virtual machine, and tweak all your settings, and then you can transfer this to physical hardware which we call a V2P, this can be achieved, with Acronis Software, and Universal Restore (to bare metaL) e.g. new PC.
0
 

Author Comment

by:esabet
ID: 39854701
Thank you.  Is VMware Workstation preferred over VMware Player?

Can you also give a brief overview of the process (i.e. How Acronis comes into the picture?).

Lastly, would I be able to run the VM and the current OS simultaneously so that I can transfer files between the two "machines"?
0
 
LVL 119
ID: 39854711
Thank you.  Is VMware Workstation preferred over VMware Player?

VMware Player is a cut down free version of VMware Workstation, which is available as a trial but not free.

Can you also give a brief overview of the process (i.e. How Acronis comes into the picture?).

It's a backup product, so you would install in the Virtual Machine, Backup to a Remote Location. e.g. USB external hard disk.

Boot your physical computer with the Acronis CDROM Media, locate the Backup, select universal restore, and Restore the Backup.

Lastly, would I be able to run the VM and the current OS simultaneously so that I can transfer files between the two "machines"?

Yes, either through normal networking, or a function called Shared Folders
0
 

Author Comment

by:esabet
ID: 39854768
Thank you again. I think now I understand the process.

Is Acronis your preferred backup/restore app?
0
 
LVL 119
ID: 39854773
For Universal Restore to Bare Metal - yes.
0

Featured Post

Complete VMware vSphere® ESX(i) & Hyper-V Backup

Capture your entire system, including the host, with patented disk imaging integrated with VMware VADP / Microsoft VSS and RCT. RTOs is as low as 15 seconds with Acronis Active Restore™. You can enjoy unlimited P2V/V2V migrations from any source (even from a different hypervisor)

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Adoption of Microsoft’s Enterprise Mobility and Security solution and Office 365 will re-order the File Sync and Share market Microsoft has stated that its Enterprise Mobility + Security (EMS) is the fastest growing product in the history of the …
Giving access to ESXi shell console is always an issue for IT departments to other Teams, or Projects. We need to find a way so that teams can use ESXTOP for their POCs, or tests without giving them the access to ESXi host shell console with a root …
This Micro Tutorial will give you a basic overview of Windows DVD Burner through its features and interface. This will be demonstrated using Windows 7 operating system.
Windows 8 came with a dramatically different user interface known as Metro. Notably missing from that interface was a Start button and Start Menu. Microsoft responded to negative user feedback of the Metro interface, bringing back the Start button a…

839 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question