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Citrix, my storage Performance Preoccupation

Posted on 2014-02-14
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Hello everyone ...
Currently I have a new virtualization platform from Citrix, which consists of the following:
- Nine servers Citrix Xenserver 6.2
- 46 VMs with Citrix XenApp 6.5
- 54 Vms VDI desktop
- FC SAN Storage

Currently, Xenserver servers are in a Pool, and share 3 500GB Luns for Write Cache of XenApp and VDI Vms.
The volume was created on RAID 6, and assume that I will support approx. 48000 IOPs, required for my virtualization solution.
I've been checking the speed of access to the system disk, using the citrix perfomanceVM, and I found worrying about the graphics performance of my storage. These measurements were taken with only 4 VMs running.
Shipping graphs I took each for a one minute interval.
Could help analyze graphs, and tell me if it is really my worry valid?

Thank you all.
Random-Read.PNG
Random-Write.PNG
Sequential-Read.PNG
Sequential-Write.PNG
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Question by:omaguirre
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Expert Comment

by:Philip Elder
ID: 39860826
It's really hard to make heads or tails of what was posted.

Try this: http://bit.ly/18iwrL0

That is SQLIO, a utility that Microsoft put out to test a disk subsystem to the max.

Philip
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Expert Comment

by:Gerald Connolly
ID: 39861042
48K IOPS sustained is going to mean a lot of HDDs probably somewhere between 350 & 480 depending on the type of disk.
Of course if you use SSDs then you only need a few to hit this number
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Duncan Meyers earned 2000 total points
ID: 39861047
The issue here is you're measuring bandwidth (MB/sec) but you need to be testing for Throughput (IOPS).

Bandwidth-wise, it's an absolute belter with 480MB/sec write and 293MB/sec read (they're BIG  numbers). The lower numbers for random read and write performance looks about right-ish, but they're not really relevant. Random workloads are all about IOPS, not MB/sec, and virtualised workloads produce highly random I/O patterns. I'd recommend re-running the random tests and capture the IOPS numbers instead of MB/sec and see how they look. RAID 6 is typically not random I/O friendly, but that depends on what the array is as a number of vendors have optimised for RAID 6 with SSD storage.
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by:Duncan Meyers
ID: 39862019
Thanks! Glad I could help.
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