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Windows 7 Peer-To-Peer

Posted on 2014-02-14
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Last Modified: 2014-02-24
It use to be, in XP, that if the username and passwords were the same on two computers that those users would have the same rights on both PCs. i.e. I have two computers. On both computers I made up identical users, Jim and John with the same passwords. I made them both administrators yet the only way I can map a network drive to the other computer is by specifying the actual administrator username and password.

Something changed with Windows 7. I want Jim and John to be administrators or both computers and be able to map network drives to the other computers. What am I doing wrong?
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Question by:LockDown32
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11 Comments
 
LVL 14

Accepted Solution

by:
comfortjeanius earned 400 total points
ID: 39860065
Network discovery makes it possible for a computer to allow other computers to "see" it on the network. If you have a computer that needs to participate in a network, you should allow network discovery on it.

Plus

A pee-to-peer network, also called a workgroup, is a network where each computer owns its own resources and can make them available. Each computer may or may not present much security. One way to secure a computer is to make sure that anybody who wants to use it must be identified. That is, everyone who wants to use the computer must have a user account on that computer.

You can check this link, "Peer-To-Peer Network Setup"

Right-click the folder -> Share With -> Specific Prople...

You can scroll down to User Accounts

Check your configurations....
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LVL 8

Assisted Solution

by:Jeff Perry
Jeff Perry earned 400 total points
ID: 39860071
I believe you need to turn on file sharing.

Here is a guide from Microsoft on file and printer sharing.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-vista/enable-file-and-printer-sharing
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LVL 8

Assisted Solution

by:Amit Khilnaney
Amit Khilnaney earned 400 total points
ID: 39860102
I believe you have already done this part, but please check and confirm.

The folder you are trying to share, check their security settings and then add both the users and allow full permissions

You need to add 4 accounts and provide full rights or at lease modify rights.

computer1(hostname, name of the pc)\Jim
computer1(hostname, name of the pc)\John

computer2(hostname, name of the pc)\Jim
computer2(hostname, name of the pc)\John
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LVL 97

Assisted Solution

by:Experienced Member
Experienced Member earned 400 total points
ID: 39860125
So long as the user name of the other computer is on "this" computer (that is, user name Jim is on John's computer), and

So long as you have file sharing turned on as per above, then,

it may be easiest to share the drive (entire drive) on John's computer to Jim. I do this and it provides unfettered access to the other machine.

Also, under Network Sharing advanced properties, and in addition to file sharing, look farther down and make sure Password Protected sharing is enabled and that both computers use user names and passwords.

NOTE:

The above turns Homegroup OFF. If you wish to use Homegroup, then look through Homegroup settings and use it instead. Homegroup is more limited that the above method.
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LVL 15

Author Comment

by:LockDown32
ID: 39860250
The part I am struggling with s sharing. When you share something you cannot specify users from other computers. You can only specify users from the computer you are sharing on.

I go back to XP.. as long as the username and password are the same XP didn't care what computer you were from. Windows 7 does care. I have found a transparent way to do it, the net use command followed by the username and password from the computer you are trying to access but what a pain.

So how do you share something and specify the users from a different computer. All the links above seem to say it can be done.
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LVL 97

Expert Comment

by:Experienced Member
ID: 39860261
If you have File Sharing enabled and use passwords, and if the "other" drive is shared, then put NET USE commands in a batch file on the desktop. I do this and once done (2 minutes of work) it is bomb-proof from there.

You can use Windows Explorer, Map Network Drive and map, but that takes longer to do.

For the way I do it above, both computers are secure against anyone one else and that is an important point.
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LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:Amit Khilnaney
ID: 39860293
Have you tried using credential manager in windows 7

found in control panel.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-in/windows7/store-passwords-certificates-and-other-credentials-for-automatic-logon
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LVL 26

Expert Comment

by:Fred Marshall
ID: 39860320
Often you need to set sharing permissions AND security on the same folder / Properties.

I usually just add Everyone and that takes care of it.
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LVL 15

Author Comment

by:LockDown32
ID: 39860384
Yes. Adding Everyone and giving them full permissions to the share did work without prompting for a username and password but the net command in the startup seemed a little more secure. I put it in a batch file that runs at startup. It also alleviates the need to use the HomeGroup. I went back to Work network and used the net command in a startup bat file.

The real difference between XP and Windows 7 seems to be that if you added a user to the Administrators Group the user was a "True" Administrator (i.e. could map a drive letter to C$) whereas in Windows 7 that user really isn't a "True" Administrator and there are a lot of thing that require a "True" Administrator (mapping a drive to C$ being one of them). Strange.....
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LVL 97

Expert Comment

by:Experienced Member
ID: 39860424
Windows 7 and Windows 8 are vastly more secure than XP. XP could be broken into without trying.

In Windows 7, administrator is disabled be design and UAC is turned on.

The NET USE method works a treat, is secure and is really simple to use after setup. It is a very small price to pay for security.

I got a Windows 8 machine and hooked it into the Windows 7 desktop with nary a thought.
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LVL 13

Assisted Solution

by:Michael Machie
Michael Machie earned 400 total points
ID: 39860472
The most important things to remember are credentials and 'ADVANCED File sharing'
In order to share this way, and do it properly, avoid the Simple Sharing Method. Go into folder options and DESELECT the 'Use Sharing Wizard' first off, then proceed below. If Simple Sharing is enabled then the 'Everyone' User is required. If you want specific credentials to access the Share, you MUST use the Advanced Method.

PC 1: (Ex. name: PC1)
- Create the two users
- Create the shared folder (Ex. Test1 at location C:\Test1)
  * share out to Everyone with Full Control
  * give full control,under Security, to both users

PC 2: (Ex. name: PC2)
- Repeat the process to create Users.
- Create Shared folder (Ex. Test2 at location C:\Test2)

To Share a folder on PC1 (Test1) to PC2:
- On PC2, click Start-and type in the 'Search/run' field:
\\PC1\Test1  ,  then - ENTER
You will be prompted for credentials
Type in: PC1\(username) and then add the password
Select 'Remember Credentials'
Create an icon to reach the folder.

Follow the same procedure for sharing from PC2 to PC1.
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