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Exchange SBS 2003 Version 6.5.7638.1

I have an Exchange Database the sizes are as follows :
priv1.edb 61.1GB
priv1.stm 15.4GB
When I check what the free space is it shows :
STM : Free 217872, Reserved 3614, Deleted 7032, Committed 3608922
EDB : Free 6453
That means that I have perhaps just under 1GB of free space in the database.
When I look at the mailboxes, there are approx. only 12 users on the system, and their total mailbox size (when looking at the system manager) is approx. 17GB.
Where is all the space gone ?
What am I missing ?
This is a pretty bog standard setup.
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josephwalsh
Asked:
josephwalsh
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1 Solution
 
stu29Commented:
Do you have any other disk space available on the server?  If so the best thing to do would be to create a new mail store on the available disk, then move each mailbox over to the new mailstore.  This requires the least down time and also is the cleanest way.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/821829

You other option is not really an option for you as you need atleast 1.5 times the size of the existing db to run an offline defrag to reclaim your whitespace.

One last link ... increasing the allowed size of your db

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/912375/en-US
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josephwalshAuthor Commented:
Disk space is not a problem.
I think that I am only allowed one mail store on SBS 2003.
My problem is, why do the mailboxes show only 17GB used, actual file space is EDB 61GB and the STM 15GB, and yet the eseutil shows that less than 1GB of free space is available on the database.
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Simon Butler (Sembee)ConsultantCommented:
You aren't missing anything.
ESM does not show the true size of the mailboxes. It only shows the content from one database, not both. You only get accurate results in Exchange 2007 and higher.

Event ID 1221 will report the free space in the database, that is the only number to depend on.

Simon.
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josephwalshAuthor Commented:
I have checked the event log.
I do not find any Event Id 1221
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josephwalshAuthor Commented:
Apologies,
I found event 1221 in the application log.
It shows 4MB of free space in the public folder and 8MB of free space in the mailbox folder, after defragmentation has finished. That was about 10 hours ago.
I will leave it for this evening. There is a backup running.
It all makes no sense.
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Simon Butler (Sembee)ConsultantCommented:
That is how much white space is available in the server.

Have a read of my blog posting from a long time ago, it explains what is happening here:
http://blog.sembee.co.uk/post/Exchange-Database-Size-and-Limits.aspx

Simon.
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stu29Commented:
Normally EDB size = Size of Mailboxes + Size of Retention Mail Items + Size of Retention Mailboxes + White Space.

Your 17gb is just your mailbox size.

Try taking a look at this ....

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa996139(EXCHG.65).aspx
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stu29Commented:
Joseph .. did you ever work this out?
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josephwalshAuthor Commented:
Yes,
I di the following.
Exchange SBS 2003 only allows one mailstore.
I disconnected the internet connection, and waited for 15 minutes.
Because the number of mailboxes were small (thankfully), I created a .pst file for each account, and copied all the emails from each Exchange mailbox to each .pst file.
I dismounted the mailstore.
I renamed the mailstore to a .old
I remounted the mailstore, but was warned that the mailstore did not exist and was given the option to create a blank mailstore, which I did (I knew I had a backup if things went wrong).
For each user, I moved the mail from the .pst file back to the mailstore.
The mailstore is now a mere 20GB.

Sometimes it is good to think outside the box.
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stu29Commented:
Nice move and thanks for sharing!
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josephwalshAuthor Commented:
The post explains how I solved the problem
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