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folder permissions

I'm running server 2008 and windows 7 as clients.
can someone explain this to me....
if I have userA and I want to give him permission only to the folder called "logos" which is located in users\documents\private\logos.   How would I accomplish that? I don't want to give this user access to all the other folders that are located under the documents and private folder.
please help.
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MrMay
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MrMay
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1 Solution
 
helpfinderCommented:
if you give him rights for Read or R&W for that Logos folder (Security permissions) and link for that folder (UNC like \\server\users\documents\private\logos), user should be able to access it, but not to go e.g. one level up
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John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Deny access to A to the general folder and then override with a specific permission to the folder they have access to.

Right click on the Folder and select Properties and then the Security Tab. You can set general security in the main tab and then you may need to use Advanced to override.

Another way (which I think is better) is to move the folder out of the general folder in question and put the specific folder somewhere else. It is easier to manage security this way as user A will be completely excluded from the general folder in question.
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regmigrantCommented:
Consider doing the above for a group rather than an individual - its much easier to manage if others need access or he leaves and you have to give it to someone else.
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MrMayAuthor Commented:
helpfinder.... if i have readandwrite permission to usera for folder logos, he can't browse to it since he doesn't have any type of permissions to the parent folders.  am I missing something here? ??
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pony10usCommented:
Another way is to give UserA List only permissions to the higher level folders and the permissions you want them to have to the logos folder. This will permit UserA to "walk" the folder structure (old term tree) to the the logos folder. They will be able to see a list of whats in the other folders but will be unable to open anything.

And yet another way is to share the logos folder and set the permissions at the share level. Then UserA can just connect to the share.
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MrMayAuthor Commented:
what is a "share level" please explain?
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pony10usCommented:
When you create a share you have the ability to set permissions.

In Windows 7:

windows share permissions
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MrMayAuthor Commented:
pony10us... this is a user-level access, right? how do I create a share-level access?

I'm not understanding this part... And yet another way is to share the logos folder and set the permissions at the share level
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pony10usCommented:
The share level is the permissions when you create the share as shown. Right click the folder and select properties. You should see a tab for sharing and one for security.

The Sharing tab is where you create the share and set share level permissions. The Security tab is where you set folder level permissions.

permissions
Share level permissions gives permissions to only those individuals that you authorize to be able to access the share.

Folder level permissions are where you give users the ability to perform actions in the folder.

I actually mentioned this as an option but it may not be the best choice in your situation.

The best way to use this option is:

1. Create the share
2. Assign change permissions to UserA on the share
3. Then go to the security tab and assign UserA whatever permissions you want them to have
4. Have UserA map a drive to the share.

This will allow them direct access through My Computer without having to go through the folder structure.
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John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Have you considered moving the required folder out the tree. It will definitely be easier for you and (done correctly) no problem for the user.
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LeeTutorretiredCommented:
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

Not enough information to confirm an answer.
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John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
@MrMay - You can move the folder out of the tree to secure it differently. This is a legitimate answer. It will work.

So why have you abandoned the question?
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