Solved

ISP Change and DNS resolution

Posted on 2014-02-21
4
203 Views
Last Modified: 2014-02-26
Hi

We are changing our ISP and I am trying to remember how Active Directory integrated DNS (which is what we are using) gets or resolves its external forward and reverse DNS information?  IE, where does the server look to, to pull this information?  an external DNS server provided by our ISP?  This was all pre-configured years ago and before my time.

We are using windows server 2003 and I went into dnsmgmt ->properties-> forwarders tab and under DNS domain to use "all other DNS domains" as apposed to configured IP addresses.

What I am worried about, is that I am not looking in the right area, and that when we change ISPs, our external DNS resolution will cease.  Am I looking in the right area and does the setting use "all other DNS domains" force our DNS server to transparently look to any external DNS servers to pull down outside DNS information, or is the setting I am after somewhere else and need to be manually configured with our new ISPs DNS servers?

thanks
0
Comment
Question by:CnicNV
  • 3
4 Comments
 
LVL 4

Assisted Solution

by:Jeffery Hayes
Jeffery Hayes earned 250 total points
ID: 39877194
This should help.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc779380(v=ws.10).aspx

Along with are there any DNS Records like Type A or MX for Mail Servers?

If so you would want to update these as well on your servers if applicable.

Hope this helps you out.
0
 

Author Comment

by:CnicNV
ID: 39877408
I am just wondering for the purposes of our internal host computers being able to continue external DNS resolution with the ISP change if anything needs to be done at all with regards to the setting use "all other DNS domains" in the forwarder tab?  There are no other IP listed in there, IE no ISP DNS server IPs or anything at all other than "all other DNS domains".   is that by it's self sufficient?

Thanks again
0
 

Accepted Solution

by:
CnicNV earned 0 total points
ID: 39878059
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:CnicNV
ID: 39888297
I discovered that I dont need to use forwarders, that the default root hint servers listed are what our dns servers are pulling everything down on.  According to the link i post above, using forwarders can speed up dns resolution but introduce single points of failure if they go down.  For example using your ISPs DNS servers.

One user even recommends only pointing to forwarders that you have control over.
0

Featured Post

How to run any project with ease

Manage projects of all sizes how you want. Great for personal to-do lists, project milestones, team priorities and launch plans.
- Combine task lists, docs, spreadsheets, and chat in one
- View and edit from mobile/offline
- Cut down on emails

Join & Write a Comment

This article is in response to a question (http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Network_Management/Network_Analysis/Q_28230497.html) here at Experts Exchange. The Original Poster (OP) requires a utility that will accept a list of IP addresses …
This is the first one of a series of articles I’ll be writing to address technical issues that are always referred to as network problems. The network boundaries have changed, therefore having an understanding of how each piece in the network  puzzl…
In this video, we discuss why the need for additional vertical screen space has become more important in recent years, namely, due to the transition in the marketplace of 4x3 computer screens to 16x9 and 16x10 screens (so-called widescreen format). …
Windows 8 came with a dramatically different user interface known as Metro. Notably missing from that interface was a Start button and Start Menu. Microsoft responded to negative user feedback of the Metro interface, bringing back the Start button a…

744 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

12 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now