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ISP Change and DNS resolution

Posted on 2014-02-21
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Last Modified: 2014-02-26
Hi

We are changing our ISP and I am trying to remember how Active Directory integrated DNS (which is what we are using) gets or resolves its external forward and reverse DNS information?  IE, where does the server look to, to pull this information?  an external DNS server provided by our ISP?  This was all pre-configured years ago and before my time.

We are using windows server 2003 and I went into dnsmgmt ->properties-> forwarders tab and under DNS domain to use "all other DNS domains" as apposed to configured IP addresses.

What I am worried about, is that I am not looking in the right area, and that when we change ISPs, our external DNS resolution will cease.  Am I looking in the right area and does the setting use "all other DNS domains" force our DNS server to transparently look to any external DNS servers to pull down outside DNS information, or is the setting I am after somewhere else and need to be manually configured with our new ISPs DNS servers?

thanks
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Question by:CnicNV
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by:Jeffery Hayes
Jeffery Hayes earned 250 total points
ID: 39877194
This should help.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc779380(v=ws.10).aspx

Along with are there any DNS Records like Type A or MX for Mail Servers?

If so you would want to update these as well on your servers if applicable.

Hope this helps you out.
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Author Comment

by:CnicNV
ID: 39877408
I am just wondering for the purposes of our internal host computers being able to continue external DNS resolution with the ISP change if anything needs to be done at all with regards to the setting use "all other DNS domains" in the forwarder tab?  There are no other IP listed in there, IE no ISP DNS server IPs or anything at all other than "all other DNS domains".   is that by it's self sufficient?

Thanks again
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CnicNV earned 0 total points
ID: 39878059
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Author Closing Comment

by:CnicNV
ID: 39888297
I discovered that I dont need to use forwarders, that the default root hint servers listed are what our dns servers are pulling everything down on.  According to the link i post above, using forwarders can speed up dns resolution but introduce single points of failure if they go down.  For example using your ISPs DNS servers.

One user even recommends only pointing to forwarders that you have control over.
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