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Connecting two 3G routers on same wired LAN?

Posted on 2014-02-23
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Last Modified: 2014-02-24
A client has their showroom located in a place where no provider is able to provide broadband connectivity. The client is unwilling to spend on a leased line as their needs are modest.

We tried a solution where we plugged in a USB 3G data card to a D-link router, connected the router to the wired LAN and had people share  the data card's internet connection. We tested this and it works fine.

But,  the problem is that the client has around 12 systems and the connection becomes slow, even at 3G speeds (well, actually, around 2 Mbps of real life speed).

The easiest option would be to purchase another USB 3G data card, plug into another D-Link router and connect this second router also to the wired LAN. But, things get hazy for me at this point as I am not a networking person. Is it possible to connect two such routers to the same LAN in this manner?

The idea is to get enough speed to cater to the connectivity needs of 12 systems. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Question by:scmeeven
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7 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:jburgaard
ID: 39880503
'...Is it possible to connect two such routers to the same LAN in this manner? '
I would say NO.
The reason is you can only have 1 default gateway.
But perhaps you could create a setup with more LAN's.
Are you using the LAN for anything else than internet-connectivity?

Anyway there could also be a competition for 3G-resources if you setup more USB 3G data cards , so capacity would less than double even in a multiple LAN 'solution'.
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Craig Beck earned 500 total points
ID: 39880602
You could use a multi-WAN router, and connect multiple 3G routers to the multi-WAN router.
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Expert Comment

by:Fred Marshall
ID: 39880736
It's not clear to me how many routers support a USB WAN.  Isn't that what you are describing here.  Which model is the Dlink?
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Author Comment

by:scmeeven
ID: 39880962
@jburgaard, I believe the LAN is primarily used for Internet connectivity, apart from printing over the network. I was also thinking that using two routers would actually create two LANs, but I am very much a novice in networking, so I am not sure. Just trying to help out a long time client here. Would one option be to use a switch and connect the two routers to it? I guess this will create two LANs, but at least each LAN would have its connectivity to itself?

@craigbeck, the multi-WAN router sounds like the thing that might help. Can you suggest any specific one? To support multiple 3G data cards, it must have multiple USB ports. Well, at least two.

@fmarshall, here is the D-Link router that combines ADSL+USB. In our tests, we only used the USB port for plugging in the 3G data card and then linked it to the LAN to share the conenction:
http://www.dlink.co.in/products/?pid=464
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by:Craig Beck
ID: 39880971
What I meant was one multi-WAN Ethernet router, and multiple 3G routers connected to it.  So for example you could use something like a FatPipe with 3x 3G routers connected to it.

Here's some info on the FatPipe...

http://www.fatpipeinc.com/xtreme/index.php
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Author Comment

by:scmeeven
ID: 39882358
I was hoping to avoid the multi-WAN router (by using a switch), but I see now that it's the right solution.

Just to be clear I have understood this correctly, you are suggesting that I do the following:

Get multiple 3G data cards, ideally from different providers
Plug each into one router
Connect each router to the WAN ports of the multi-WAN router

Is this correct?

After some research, I decided to go with the Peplink Balance  multi-wan router.
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Expert Comment

by:Craig Beck
ID: 39882402
Yes, so obtain 3 different 3G routers.  Insert one 3G SIM into each 3G router.  Connect the 3G routers to the Peplink router.
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