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How Do DNS Root Hints on a DC integrated DNS server work?

Posted on 2014-02-24
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Last Modified: 2014-02-24
I have a quick question that relates to my own conceptual understanding.

I have a domain controller that is setup as our LANs DNS server using active directory integrated DNS.  This server is using Root Hints and not Forwarders for our networks public DNS resolution.

I am just wondering, are Root Hints completely independent for DNS resolution, in the sense that the Domain Controllers will be pulling down DNS info from these preconfigured root DNS servers?  Or does there still need to be additional DNS settings somewhere, like on your router pointing to your ISP or OpenDNS or Google or something?  I know this is exactly what forwarders do.  So the answer I am expecting is no, and that root hints will allow for DNS resolution all by them selves.  Also, the two Domain controllers network card settings are pointing to each-other as primary and themselves as secondary to stop the DNS island effect.

I just want to make sure, that when we move offices and our WAN ISP information changes that our domain controllers will still be able to do DNS resolution as long as our router has its new WAN IP, default gateway, and subnet mask, while of course the internal IP scope remains the same.

thanks
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Question by:CnicNV
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CompProbSolv earned 500 total points
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One preferred method of setting up DNS is as you described.  No forwarders, just Root Hints.  In addition, the server and workstation IP settings should point only to the local server for DNS.  This should work properly and be portable.

You can get better results if you use a forwarder on the server to an appropriate DNS (possibly at your ISP), but this will mean that you have to change it if the ISP changes.

If no one is pointing at the router for DNS, it shouldn't matter to workstations or to the server how the router is configured for DNS.  Of course, the router won't be able to resolve names if you don't point it at something valid for DNS, but that may not be an issue.
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