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two networks share same printer?

Posted on 2014-02-24
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Last Modified: 2014-02-25
hi,
  I have a computer connected behind a sonic wall via Ethernet to a cable modem with a gateway of  10.1.10.1 and I also have a wireless modem with a gateway of 192.198.1.1 and printer attached to it.  how can I get my Ethernet connected computer (10.0.1.1 gateway) to print to the printer on the wireless router (192.168.1.1).  thank you :-)
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Question by:StewartGilligan
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by:Akinsd
ID: 39884320
Create a route to the networks

- On Sonic wall, create a route to Wireless Modem
eg 192.198.1.0 255.255.255.0 10.1.10.1

- On Wireless Modem
eg 10.1.10.1 255.255.255.0 192.198.1.1

This route configuration is an example of how it would be configured using cisco devices.
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Fred Marshall earned 250 total points
ID: 39884380
There are a few ways to do what you want but first we should really understand what you have.  I'm getting this from the description:

<internet> cable modem <> Sonicwall <> computer

Presumably, if the computer's gateway is 10.0.1.1 then that's the LAN address of the Sonicwall.  Is that right?

And, presumably the cable modem is the gateway and its LAN address is 10.1.10.1.  Is that right?

So this would make it:
<internet> [public IP address] cable modem [private LAN address 10.1.10.1]
[private LAN address on WAN 10.1.10.xxx] Sonicwall (with NAT) <>[private LAN address on LAN 10.0.1.1]
private LAN subnet 10.0.1.0/24 where the computer resides as 10.0.1.xxx.

That seems like it must be the way things are.  
BUT, where is the wireless "modem" (router?) plugged in?
Is it on the LAN side of the cable modem or on the LAN side of the Sonicwall?

Now, either you want the wireless clients to have access to the LAN with the "computer" on it or you don't.  It sound like you do - and perhaps not only the printer.
So you have 2 choices for your ultimate objective:
1) wired and wireless computers able to communicate fully (which includes the printer).
2) wired and wireless computers NOT able to communicate fully but just the printer for the wireless clients.

The first one is easiest:

I would plug the LAN side of the wireless router into the LAN side of the Sonicwall.
The attached diagram shows how to do that.

But, if you want to isolate the computers to some degree then you could use one of the configurations in the second attached file and likely put the printer on the LAN side of the cable modem.  (If the cable modem LAN doesn't have multiple ports then simply add a switch to get more ports).
Wireless-Router-as-a-Simple-Swit.pdf
Multiple-Subnets.pdf
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by:StewartGilligan
ID: 39884412
my main objective is to keep the two networks completely separate from each other but  be able to both use the printer that's connected upstairs to the wireless router.  is one of those diagrams what I need?  please excuse my naiveté :-(
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by:Akinsd
Akinsd earned 250 total points
ID: 39884560
Absence of routes does not isolate networks per se, but yes, the devices won't know how to access each other without routes. There are ways however that circumvents this, so if the need to isolate the network is critical, you may want to consider configuring an access list.

Create an access list that only permits traffic to the printer from the 10.x network
eg
eg 192.198.1.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.10.1  
ip access-list Extended PRINTER
permit 192.198.1.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.10.1  

Alternatively, on the 10 network, create a route just to the printer
eg ip route 192.198.1.50 255.255.255.255 10.1.10.1

Leave the 2nd route intact. (Note the correction in the wild card mask)
eg ip route 10.1.10.1 0.0.0.0 192.198.1.1
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Author Comment

by:StewartGilligan
ID: 39885667
before I begin.  here is what I have when trying to print to wireless printer from computer that is connected via Ethernet.  the Ethernet is on 10.1 (assigned by sonic wall?). why is the wireless address 169.254... and the printer seems to be at 192.168.....  im lost  thanks
nicole-network.pdf
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Expert Comment

by:Akinsd
ID: 39885680
169.254.x.x is an APIPA address. This means the computer could not obtain an address from the DHCP server and automatically assigns itself a class B address. Is DHCP turned on on the wireless router? If yes, you may want to reboot the router.
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Expert Comment

by:Fred Marshall
ID: 39887183
This outcome often arises when the wireless passphrase is entered incorrectly.  I've had to try up to 6 times to get it right when I *knew* the passphrase!  It can happen.
Thanks for the points!
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