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DCount Syntax

Posted on 2014-02-26
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Last Modified: 2014-02-26
Hi,

Table is tblOrders
Field Name is CustomerNumber

I want to display the number of times a CUSTOMER has placed an order.

So, if I am looking at a form that displays a single order for CUSTOMER 888 - I want the form to display that this CUSTOMER has 999 Orders already.

Each time an order is displayed on the screen , then there should also be a display of the total number of orders placed by that customer.

What's the DCOUNT format??

Thanks!
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Question by:Patrick O'Dea
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4 Comments
 
LVL 19

Assisted Solution

by:MINDSUPERB
MINDSUPERB earned 150 total points
ID: 39888381
Try this:

=DCount("[CustomerNumber]", "tblOrders", "[CustomerNumber] = 888")

Sincerely,

Ed
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LVL 84
ID: 39888384
Without knowing your table structure it's hard to give exact syntax, but assuming you have an Orders table, with a field named Customer, then something like:

Nz(DCount("IDField", "Orders", "Customer=" & Me.Customer),0)

If "Customer" is a Text field:

Nz(DCount("IDField", "Orders", "Customer='" & Me.Customer & "'"),0)

This would tell you the number of orders EVER placed by the customer.

"IDFIeld" is any field in the table, although it's generally better to use an indexed field. If you have an Autonumber field in the table  use that.
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LVL 84

Accepted Solution

by:
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 350 total points
ID: 39888386
Note that you'd want to do this on the Form's Current event, so something like this:

Sub Form_Current()
  Me.YourControl = Nz(DCount("IDField", "Orders", "Customer='" & Me.Customer & "'"),0)
End Sub
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Author Closing Comment

by:Patrick O'Dea
ID: 39888467
Thanks!
0

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