Droid 2 global and other phones - is 5GHz a common band these days?

BeGentleWithMe-INeedHelp
BeGentleWithMe-INeedHelp used Ask the Experts™
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I am running inssider on my old droid 2 global.  It shows no 5GHz signals.  is that because

a) that model doesn't use / have 5Ghz hardware and that's why it's not showing any
b) 5GHz isn't used much (yet)
c) I checked in the wrong areas : )

iphone v. X (solve for x) does / does not use 5GHz if it's available?

Do you specificailly have to look for hardware that says 5GHz?  Or because it is (ONLY???) 802.11a, it isn't used?  802.11a has been around a LOOONG time, right?  I have never really seen 802.11a hardware and then by extension is that why 5GHz is not used?
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Top Expert 2014
Commented:
Inssider won't show 5GHz signals if the WLAN card doesn't support 5GHz (802.11a), or if there are no devices using 5GHz in the area you're scanning.

iDevices do use 5GHz (not all though) and generally they'll prefer 5GHz over 2.4GHz (but not always).

If you want 5GHz hardware it should say it's 802.11a compliant.
Commented:
Your phone does not support 5 GHz, iPhone only started 5GHz after iPhone 5. Samsung has it in their higher Galaxy S range since SGS3.
And no, the current batch of 5GHz connections you see flying around sparsely is not 802.11a, which is indeed old (and hardware is not easy to come by). It's usually 802.11n, as you can spot them easily in the shops now with a big "N" and "Dualband" or 5GHz on the box. The reason you don't see it that often is the price overshadowing cheaper singleband N access points and routers, and the consumer usually not knowing the difference (and hence going for the cheaper model)
Top Expert 2014
Commented:
And no, the current batch of 5GHz connections you see flying around sparsely is not 802.11a, which is indeed old (and hardware is not easy to come by). It's usually 802.11n, as you can spot them easily in the shops now with a big "N" and "Dualband" or 5GHz on the box.
This is incorrect.

A Wifi-standard 5GHz device will ONLY see 802.11a devices.  The technology has been around since 1999 and is still used today, albeit sparsely in the SOHO environment compared to 2.4GHz devices due to manufacturing costs.  However it is still mainstream and vendors such as Cisco and Aruba use it extensively in their enterprise Wifi products.  

802.11n is simply an extension of the band, so 802.11n is NOT the 5GHz band - it is an extension of the 5GHz band, but it is also an extension of the 2.4GHz band.

A dual-band router will display something like:

802.11a/g
or
802.11a/b/g

A dual-band router with 802.11n will display:

802.11a/g/n
or
802.11a/b/g/n

A single-band router with 802.11n will display:

802.11b/g/n

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