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Router requirements for BGP stub routing

Posted on 2014-02-27
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Last Modified: 2014-03-01
Hi all,

I am planning to have BGP peering with two ISP's. I am planning to do BGP stub only. I need to purchase routers to do so. Which router would be able to meet the minimum requirements most cost efficiently.

Thanks
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Question by:saarmstrong
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by:Akinsd
Akinsd earned 100 total points
ID: 39893049
Most Cisco Routers with large RAM and Flash running enterprise IOS will suffice.

The critical part is knowing how busy your traffic is, as that will determine how high-end you need to go.

A loose suggestion would be 2800s, 2900s, 3800s or 3900s series
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by:skullnobrains
skullnobrains earned 200 total points
ID: 39893383
the bgp requirements are more or less zero. given the fact it is a stub, you don't even need to store the 50k routes since all your traffic goes through your 2 ISPs so bgp will merely announce "i am as number X possessing this set of ips and i'm available here, please forward the information" from time to time

likewise the routing will need very little cpu since the routing table will be small

so if you only need failover, anything that have fast enough interfaces will do

then if you need load-balancing, nat, statefull firewalling, or the likes, you'll additionally need something that is capable to store all the sessions in it's ram.

if you want fancy stuff such as deep protocol inspection, antivirus, ... you'll also need lots of CPU power

can you please give a little more info regarding what you are trying to do and what traffic you expect ?

note that if you already have a network, it is very likely that your existing equipment can do bgp. a regular machine with bgp software can also do the same.
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LVL 46

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by:Craig Beck
ID: 39894916
What are you wanting to do?  Do you just want to distribute your own AS into BGP or is there more to it?
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by:saarmstrong
ID: 39894925
Hi My requirement is to have failover for my inbound traffic. So i will need to advertise my routes to both ISP's.
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by:Craig Beck
ID: 39894961
Ok, so really then your real BGP-capability requirements are next-to-zero, as skullnobrains said.  All you're really wanting to do is advertise your range into BGP and route via a preferred route, using the other link as a fallback.

Any Cisco router will do this as long as it includes the BGP4 feature.

What is the size of each pipe?
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Author Comment

by:saarmstrong
ID: 39895015
Thanks for the replies.
well the main one is 100 Mbps and the failover one is 10 Mb. Does this make any effect?
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LVL 46

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by:Craig Beck
Craig Beck earned 200 total points
ID: 39895097
Not on BGP, but it will if you need to choose a router which can shift 100Mbps traffic.

A 2951 will do this, but a 2851 won't if you go off Cisco's router sizing guide.  However, unless you use lots of features like NAT, firewall, etc, you should be fine with any router which includes a gigabit port.
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by:saarmstrong
ID: 39895127
I  have a 2911, is that good enough ? Natting, firewall and other stuff will be done via ASA's.
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LVL 46

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by:Craig Beck
Craig Beck earned 200 total points
ID: 39895186
Good enough for me :-)
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LVL 27

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by:
skullnobrains earned 200 total points
ID: 39896246

well the main one is 100 Mbps and the failover one is 10 Mb. Does this make any effect?

I  have a 2911, is that good enough ? Natting, firewall and other stuff will be done via ASA's.

a desktop host from the early 90s running a pentium2 might be a bit short on performance... ISA buses are not very suitable for 100Mbps traffic ;)

2911 will be more than fine

also note that you can sometimes allow bgp traffic through the ASA and configure it on a host/router behind the ASA
http://amplebrain.blogspot.fr/2009/10/configuring-bgp-through-pixasa.html
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