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Using Disk Utility to create partition in Ubuntu

Posted on 2014-02-27
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Last Modified: 2014-03-22
I am trying to use Disk Utility GUI to create partition, but I do not see the button that should say create partition.
I could not take the screenshot of whole window, but I scrolled right and left and could not see where to create partition

part
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Question by:jskfan
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11 Comments
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:peea
ID: 39893870
Simply right click on the drive space, any options available?
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 39893914
I did…it does not do anything
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LVL 7

Assisted Solution

by:peea
peea earned 240 total points
ID: 39893935
It seems the 11GB drive has been fully used in EXT4. If it is the only partition and you boot from the partition, you cannot create new partition and even cannot remove the only partition.

You need to boot from another drive, say CD/DVD for example, to modify the partition settings of current active partition.
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LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:TobiasHolm
ID: 39893967
Create a bootable USB stick with GParted:

http://gparted.org/liveusb.php
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LVL 27

Assisted Solution

by:skullnobrains
skullnobrains earned 1280 total points
ID: 39896911
you cannot create a partition in a disk that already contains a partition that fills it up.

if it is your system partition, ubuntu will not let you shrink or destroy that partition either.

in that case, like mentioned above, using a bootable media is an idea. you can boot from whatever install media you used in order to install your ubuntu, and either use the builtin tool or the better gparted ( type "apt-get install gparted" and then run "sudo gparted" ). this will allow to shrink the existing partition and create a new one.

given the fact this is a virtual machine, you can also make the disk bigger in vmware and reboot. the filesystem and existing partition size will not change so you'll have free space after the existing partition. you can also attach another disk.
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LVL 62

Assisted Solution

by:gheist
gheist earned 240 total points
ID: 39898814
Actually you can rescan scsi in vmware and get the new size. If you have LVM you can even expand / to new space...
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LVL 27

Assisted Solution

by:skullnobrains
skullnobrains earned 1280 total points
ID: 39899702
to detect changes in disk sizes online :

blockdev --rereadpt <device file>

to detect new disks online :

echo "- - -" > /sys/class/scsi_host/*/scan

both the above will work with SATA and SCSI drives, and i guess for SAS drives as well. no idea about IDE drives. better not to use them anyway in virtual machines. these commands need to be run in the guest machine as root.
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 39920220
I guess I cannot resize the boot partition, I do not see the option:

gparted
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LVL 18

Assisted Solution

by:TobiasHolm
TobiasHolm earned 240 total points
ID: 39920236
Did you boot on the USB-stick (or ISO)? You can't resize the partition you're booting from.
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LVL 27

Accepted Solution

by:
skullnobrains earned 1280 total points
ID: 39923311
+1
quote from myself

if it is your system partition, ubuntu will not let you shrink or destroy that partition either.

given the fact the mountpoint is "/" it most definitely is the partition where your system is installed and it is hence mounted

you can boot from whatever install media you used in order to install your ubuntu, and either use the builtin tool or the better gparted ( type "apt-get install gparted" and then run "sudo gparted" ). this will allow to shrink the existing partition and create a new one.

a knoppix live cd, a partition magic live cd or whatever other live cd will be able to do the trick
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 39947474
Thank you Guys!
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