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AIX Crontab NULLED

Posted on 2014-02-28
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Last Modified: 2014-02-28
As root on an AIX server a user ran a command "crontab" and pressed enter. As soon after he did this he did a "Ctrl z", This seems to have nulled the root crontab file. Is this possible, What is the explanation behind this.

I replicated the issue on a different server but root crontab entries were intact. So just by running "crontab" will this null the file, as I know that "crontab -e" does editing of crontab, "-e" option was not specified.
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Question by:aanya247
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7 Comments
 

Author Comment

by:aanya247
ID: 39894914
$ crontab
[1] + Stopped (SIGTSTP)        crontab
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Accepted Solution

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woolmilkporc earned 300 total points
ID: 39894937
crontab alone opens an empty file for editing. Upon exit this file overwrites the original crontab.

ctrl-z alone cannot null a file. The user must have issued a write command, such as ":wq" or ":x" or "ZZ".

Could it be that it wasn't "ctrl-z" but "shift-zz"?
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LVL 5

Assisted Solution

by:Dave Gould
Dave Gould earned 200 total points
ID: 39895109
ctrl-z just suspends the vi process. If the user types "jobs" he should see that the process is still there and can bring it back to the foreground by typing fg.
This should bring him back to the vi process which he can simply force quit (:q!)

It is possible that this advice is a bit late if the user has already logged out.
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Author Comment

by:aanya247
ID: 39895222
Its Too late now... :) thank you that is something which I did not think.
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LVL 68

Expert Comment

by:woolmilkporc
ID: 39895238
ctrl-z alone will never destroy a file, I keep telling you.

Test: Issue "crontab", then hit ctrl-z, then issue "exit" twice.
Log in again and you will find the crontab unchanged.

And are you aware that "crontab -r" will delete the crontab without asking for confirmation?
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Author Comment

by:aanya247
ID: 39895317
Wmp
Ur solutions are very valuable and I learn a lot from them, I understood from the first comment that Ctrl Z, will not delete but I never knew that jobs is a command that can be run to find out.

So I am sorry for the distribution of points and I know that ur first comment solved my question .

Thanks again
Aanya
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LVL 68

Expert Comment

by:woolmilkporc
ID: 39895351
Never mind, I'm always glad to help, regardless of the points.

Thx for them!

wmp
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